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Common Anime Terms.



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Common Anime Terms.
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W0m6at
Washu Hakubi


Joined: 27 Oct 2004
Posts: 391
Location: Seaton, SA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Since I stumbled across this term the other day, and it's one most people will want to avoid, I thought I'd share.

guro - It's a gore- / mutilation-fetish form of hentai. Since it's pretty disgusting stuff, I'll put examples (concepts, not titles) in spoiler tags:
People cutting themselves up with razorblades. Women slicing their breasts off seems popular.
Internal organs splayed out onto the table/floor.
Dismemberment, with the spaces left where bone had been used as an additional orifice for sexual pleasure.

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Sukugaru
Doraemon


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2005 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Yes, thank you W0m6at, you have made me remember things I really don't want to. Blargh. :sick:

Guro: As I understand it, the Japanese got this by taking the English word 'Grotesque' and Japanising it. And 'grotesque' certainly fits.

Now let us never speak of this again.
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Friezaess
Minawa Andou


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2005 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Yeah. Guro's taken sadomasochism to the extreme.

As if 4chan hadn't corrupted me enough >_>

Luv and glomps,
~Fri
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Tabasco
Hajime Saitou


Joined: 25 Mar 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Damn!! they have those sorts of hentai!!?? that is just plain filthy and disgusting!!....I think I'm gonna throw up....(damn my curious nature...who can resist spoiler tags anyways...)
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Cor
Arumi Asahina


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'm surprised that 'glomp' doesn't have a description in there lol. Especially since Fri is posting in this thread.
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XxChris43xX
Doraemon


Joined: 26 Mar 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2005 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
So OVA and OAV are pretty much the same then huh? Since I've seen Rurouni Kenshin/samurai x OVA and OAV's, i always wanted to know what they meant...
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2005 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
XxChris43xX wrote:
So OVA and OAV are pretty much the same then huh? Since I've seen Rurouni Kenshin OVA and OAV's, i always wanted to know what they meant...


Exactly the same thing.
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XxChris43xX
Doraemon


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2005 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I can't believe that there are such things as "guro" or grotesque anime.......I've never seen it, and I don't think I wana see it.....They shouldn't make hentai either, I mean come on, who wants to see anime characters that do the nasty like if it was porn......And boy on boy.......makes me sickjust thinking bout it.......Ya gotta be a sicko to watch it.....ya pervs......
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Mr Waffle
TEH WAFFLES!!11!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2005 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
XxChris43xX wrote:
I can't believe that there are such things as "guro" or grotesque anime.......I've never seen it, and I don't think I wana see it.....They shouldn't make hentai either, I mean come on, who wants to see anime characters that do the nasty like if it was porn......And boy on boy.......makes me sickjust thinking bout it.......Ya gotta be a sicko to watch it.....ya pervs......


Get over it. People are allowed to enjoy what they want to enjoy. People think people older than 10 shouldn't watch cartoons at all, you know Rolling Eyes you're just as "sick" as the people who like what you mentioned.

Back on topic, now.
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XxChris43xX
Doraemon


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2005 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Ah, great.....it had to be a madboard mod eh?....Well ya got me, I won't say nothin' to provoke you....wouldn't want to get banned.....

"you know you're just as "sick" as the people who like what you mentioned." (that one stung a little.... Evil or Very Mad feisty eh?...)

Actually your right....people should watch what they want......."whatever tickles your pickle" right?.....
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Mr Waffle
TEH WAFFLES!!11!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2005 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
XxChris43xX wrote:
Actually your right....people should watch what they want......."whatever tickles your pickle" right?.....


hehehe. I haven't heard that one before Razz

Japan has some... interesting tastes. It's best to leave it at that XD
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Toxic Rabbit
Hajime Saitou


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Well, it's a shame to change the subject from sick fetish hentai but I've got a question which may be able to be answered here. On my Samurai Champloo DVD Mahiro Maeda is credited as "E-mono Designer".

What does E-mono mean?
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Toxic Rabbit wrote:
What does E-mono mean?


Probably some sort of drawing or picture, at a guess. Hard to tell for sure without seeing how the japanese spell it.
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
This is the post where I dance with a monkey to distract you while my confederate steals the duplicate post I made accidently.
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Toxic Rabbit
Hajime Saitou


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
A drawing or picture, eh? That's a safe guess with anime! I was hoping for some sort of definition or translation...
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wariomona
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2005 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
What's that DVD extra called CLEAN opening/closing animation? (i don't have any dvds that have them)
[spoiler]Clean the FLOORS![/spoiler]
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W0m6at
Washu Hakubi


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2005 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
wariomona wrote:
What's that DVD extra called CLEAN opening/closing animation? (i don't have any dvds that have them)
[spoiler]Clean the FLOORS![/spoiler]


It's usually referred to as a "creditless" OP/ED.
It basically means the credits aren't getting in the way of/distracting from the opening/closing animation.
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blob_blob88_123
Doraemon


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2005 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
hey i think its great u put all those definitions cuz my bf just got me into anime so im not exactly sure on all the meanings. but now ill b able to understand more hehehe thanx agen
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Inniss 1428
Kagami Hiiragi


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2005 2:23 pm    Post subject: ... Reply with quote
Gaz wrote:
I'm surprised that 'glomp' doesn't have a description in there lol. Especially since Fri is posting in this thread.

Good idea. I myself didn't know what this meant until a few minutes ago.
Wikipedia wrote:
Glomp is a term often used by anime fans, most often used on IRC. Usually used as a verb to 'glomp' someone is usually to latch on to or hug a person quite tightly, in the style a real child might hug a much taller adult's leg tightly. Thus the hug is merely affectionate, never sexual, no matter how tight the hug is.

A glomp is also often compared to "A kind of tackle huggie" where the person will randomly run up to and tightly hug the victim of the glomp. It is common to surprise a very close friend with a glomp, but one should never randomly glomp a stranger or someone they are not extremely close to.

People often make up their own variations such as "Running Tackle Glomp" or "hugglomp". Glomping is often prevalent at anime conventions.

Though much disputed, it is commonly believed that the term "glomp" originated in Ranma fandom. While never mentioned in the series itself, it is commonly used by fans to describe the way in which the character Shampoo commonly attached herself to the main character, Ranma.

The word "glomp" comes from the sound created by such a hug, in that running up to the "glompee" is usually involved. Sometimes glomps can be "jump-hugs," or "tackle-hugs," and sometimes the person being glomped can be set off balance or even toppled over.

Some of you animé fans are weird... Laughing
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Trunk's Girl
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2005 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
That is the most accurate and indepth definition of glomp I have ever read. Go wikipedia! Very Happy
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Trunk's Girl
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2005 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Toxic Rabbit wrote:
On my Samurai Champloo DVD Mahiro Maeda is credited as "E-mono Designer".

What does E-mono mean?


I took a look at the site which had the kanji 得物 for emono. Looking that up, it means specialized weapon/skill. So in this case, Mahiro Maeda was the designer for the weapons in Samurai Champloo.
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Knight of L-sama
Masamune Shirow


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2005 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Recently I have discovered an alternate interpretation for the orgin of the term yuri (aka female/female sex and/or relationships with a sexual component)

Yuricon recently held an event in Tokyo and one of the guest speakers was an author and editor of a mgazine for Japan's Gay and Lesbian community back in the 50's. He apparently coined the term barazoku (Rose Tribe) for gay men and yurizoku (Lily Tribe) for lesbians. The first term never seemed to have made much impact but the term yurizoku stuck around long enough (though shortened to just yuri) for it to be picked up by fans in the west where continues in use to today.

Still no idea where the term yaoi comes from.
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Chocobahn
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2005 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
If you guys have a chance, pick this one up from the bookshelf.

The anime companion: what's Japanese in Japanese animation? by Gilles Poitras

Yes, it's a book that you can read. Stay away from the computer for a while and read a book instead.

It explains the common Japanese stuff seen in Anime, like places, people, terminology, things that Anime characters use throughout the series, etc. It's quite a fascinating read.
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Trunk's Girl
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2005 1:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Knight of L-sama wrote:

Still no idea where the term yaoi comes from.


It's an acronym for a Japanese metaphor I can't remember off the top my head ("yama....something something something"). The phrase implies (although not literally) that stories of boy love just focus on throwing them into "situations" instead of an actual story.
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Uniforce
Minawa Andou


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2005 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
back on first page for ya Wink

Remxi wrote:
Trunk's Girl wrote:
yaoi - rather graphic boy-on-boy love. Somebody else can post up what it stands for because I can't remember.


IIRC, it stands for something that translates to No Mountain, No Climax, No Point. That is in reference to the fact that most Yaoi focuses mainly on the shounen-ai bit, and leaves out the story (hence "No Point").

I probably didn't make much sense there. Someone else here explained it much better (perhaps it was Queenie).

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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2005 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
The Comics Journal wrote:

yaoi (an acronym that stands for yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi, or "no climax, no resolution, no meaning," although it is joked that it stands for YAmete, Oshiri Itai, or "stop, my butt hurts")


XD
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Kohaku
Minawa Andou


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Could someone give me the meaning of the term shoutacon and perphaps a definition of Loli or Lolicon would be helpful for the list also.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Kohaku wrote:
Could someone give me the meaning of the term shoutacon and perphaps a definition of Loli or Lolicon would be helpful for the list also.


Shouta is little boy (not sure of the literal meaning...). Loli is Lolita, as in little girl. NFI what the 'con' bit actually means, but lolicon is basically... the love of lolis XD (may or may not be sexual) so the same thing applies.
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Kohaku
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Loli is short for Lolita, The dictionary definition for Lolita is a seductive adolescent girl.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Kohaku wrote:
Loli is short for Lolita, The dictionary definition for Lolita is a seductive adolescent girl.


...Didn't I just say that? It's innocent, but sexual at the same time. The Japanese fully exploit this interesting concept, especially with things like Gothic Lolita.
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Inniss 1428
Kagami Hiiragi


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 6:32 pm    Post subject: ... Reply with quote
Mr Waffle wrote:
Loli is Lolita, as in little girl. NFI what the 'con' bit actually means.

Lolicon = Lolita Complex.
Wikipedia is your friend.

Gosuloli is hawt. Embarassed

BTW, Waffle, pic #8 in that page you linked to is a famous cross-dresser if I'm not mistaken.
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Kohaku
Minawa Andou


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Didn't I just say that? It's innocent, but sexual at the same time.


I didn't say you didn't. I was just simply saying what the dictionary definition was if anybody was interested.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 7:01 pm    Post subject: Re: ... Reply with quote
Inniss 1428 wrote:
BTW, Waffle, pic #8 in that page you linked to is a famous cross-dresser if I'm not mistaken.


Mana, from Malice Mizer and Moi dix Mois (j 'rock' bands). Also often found in Gothic Lolita Bible magazine... his outfits are exceptionally pretty.

Kohaku wrote:
I didn't say you didn't.


Sorry, I misread your original post, thinking you were asking for the definition.
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GoktimusPrime
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2005 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
XxChris43xX wrote:
I can't believe that there are such things as "guro" or grotesque anime.......I've never seen it, and I don't think I wana see it.....They shouldn't make hentai either, I mean come on, who wants to see anime characters that do the nasty like if it was porn......And boy on boy.......makes me sickjust thinking bout it.......Ya gotta be a sicko to watch it.....ya pervs......


Sorry for necromancing an old thread, as newbs is me...

Now, if you're going to bag out on hentai (or pornography in general), do it properly. Simply sitting there hurling emotional banter by saying that it's sick and that people who watch it are sick and calling all hentai fans pervs is honestly just hostile flaming and does nothing to champion your cause - and naturally you're going to get an equally hostile reaction from other people, including mods (who I'm surprised haven't deleted or editted your posts).

The arguments against hentai is basically an expansion of the argument against pornography. The argument against pornography (hereby referred to as "the Negative") states that pornography dehumanises people - that it portrays people, often women, as being nothing more than objects of sexual desire, rather than rational human beings. For example, when people watch porno, they're not exactly thinking, "zOMG! I wonder what her views on Socialism are?!" *ahem*
The audience is not appreciating the character as a character - they are merely glorifying and objectifying them as a desirable object - as a slab of meat.

This then leads to the argument that hentai is - for the most part - inherently misogynistic, or more accurately, promotes misogyny. More grotesque forms of hentai, particularly any hentai which portrays rape, hentai tentacle beasts (mmm... panties...) et al., are all forms of hentai which abound in misogyny.

Some people would argue that unlike pornography, hentai is entirely fictional. Whereas real life porn actually requires actors to physically engage in debased acts of debauchery etc., hentai - only involves a series of drawings. There is no real rape actually occuring, even on a level of fantasy between actors. However proponents for the Negative would argue that the problem with hentai is that is promotes the same concepts and ideals of real pornography which are objectionable. There is also the fact that many hentai seiyuu are also "AV Idols" (porn actors).

Having said that, there are arguments in favour of hentai (henceforth referred to as "the Affirmative"). One quick argument is that hentai is enjoyed by consenting adults, and if people don't like it - then don't watch it. Of course, this argument fails to address the deeper socio-psychological arguments from the Negative (objectification of women, promotion of misogyny etc.). A more powerful argument for the Affirmative is the Catharsis argument. As the name suggests, this argument proposes that the viewing of hentai - and hentai combined with tragedy, such as guro hentai etc., has a cathartic effect on the audience. Some evidence for this does exist in the fact that in countries where there are far heavier forms of censorship against violence, rape etc. in cartoons such as the United States, there are far higher incidences of violent and sexual crimes occuring in real life. Whereas in countries where fictional violence and sexual crimes are more readily available in cartoons, comic books etc., there are far lower occurences of actual violent and sexual crimes in real life. Anyone who has ever been to Japan will know that it is a very safe and peaceful country, where a schoolgirl can walk home at night without fear of being attacked or raped (and indeed it's not an uncommon sight to see schoolgirls walking around in the evening/night, usually going home after Cram School).

So really... if you guys want to argue for or against hentai (or any other issue), just do it rationally and put forward your respective arguments. There's no need to degenerate yourselves by calling each other names.

Re: Lolicon - there's also Mazacon; "Mother Complex."
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GoktimusPrime
Lin Minmay


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Jidaigeki (時代劇) - "historical drama"

Refers to anything that is based on feudal Japan. Includes anything that involves samurai, ninja, geisha, monks, kabuki et al.
The term extends well beyond animé/manga - any movie, TV show, book etc that is based on feudal Japan can be said to be Jidaigeki, thus anything from Rurouni Kenshin to Kurosawa Akira's movies can all be collectively classified as Jidaigeki.

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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
GoktimusPrime wrote:
Jidaigeki (時代劇) - "historical drama"


Not the most common anime term, but it's good enough Razz *updates*
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AnimeAdvance
Doraemon


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
WOW way cool images
and plus
how do you guys get your own avatars
and i seen one on madman that is 25.6kb and it still works
and i can't even fit one thats only 10.6 kbs
not fair humff
and what dose madboard (mod) mean anyways

im talking about the word (MOD)
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HimuraBattousai
Kagami Yagami


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
To answer your questions:

Create or modify an image in Photoshop or the image editing software of your choice, to be no larger than 100x100 pixels or 8KB filesize, upload it to your webspace, and enter the URL for the image without any additional tags in the "link to off-site avatar" field in your profile.

The filesize should be a lot smaller than that, but it's not always a simple matter to keep an eye on the filesizes of everyone's avatars.

And mod is short for moderator, the people who make sure people are behaving themselves.
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Doraemon


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
thank you miss
*bow three times*
now where to find photoshop
i heard on another forum here
i mean chat space
(you should know what i mean)
that it is $1200
to buy photoshop
ahh yes its Kat
from kenny the shark
the person with the girl named Kat on as avatar

well another word in is what are tags on the website thingy you said
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HimuraBattousai
Kagami Yagami


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
It's "mister", just for the record.

Anyway, if you don't feel like paying $1200 for Photoshop, download this instead.

And please try to keep to the topic of discussion in a thread. If you want to ask about avatars or the like, start a thread in the Madhouse instead of asking about it in any old thread.
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Doraemon


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
thank you mister!
sorry i thought you were miss because of your picture
right
whats a thread
lol
*everyone around flips upside down like anime*
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Doraemon


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
GoktimusPrime wrote:
Jidaigeki (時代劇) - "historical drama"

Refers to anything that is based on feudal Japan. Includes anything that involves samurai, ninja, geisha, monks, kabuki et al.
The term extends well beyond animé/manga - any movie, TV show, book etc that is based on feudal Japan can be said to be Jidaigeki, thus anything from Rurouni Kenshin to Kurosawa Akira's movies can all be collectively classified as Jidaigeki.


cool you know alot about these stuff , samurai Japanese feudal stuff ^_^
Kill Kill Kill
and cut people in half kinda stuff
[Edit]
Whops i forgot no double posting
sorry sorry sorry
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Chupa Chups
Shinobu Nagumo


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
StorminNorman wrote:
Nosebleeds - Easier to depict than an erection.

The lady throwing water onto the street - Usually throwing out dirty water. Often shown to indicate some sort of bad thing happening.

The washing lines - Fanservice, or just indication of domesticity, depending on content of the washing line.

Students cleaning the school - Afterschool activity. Students actually do this in Japan.

Also, if you see someone sneezing in anime, it's almost always because they are being spoken about by someone else.



Nosebleed - always cracks me up!

Cleaning the school - Heck, I cleaned the school after school... and I didn't go to school in Japan.

Sneezing - Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it's a superstition, partiuclarly if you sneeze multiple times consecutively.

I dont understand how the washing line is fanservice.
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HimuraBattousai
Kagami Yagami


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Chupa Chups wrote:
StorminNorman wrote:
The washing lines - Fanservice, or just indication of domesticity, depending on content of the washing line.

I dont understand how the washing line is fanservice.


Even anime characters wash their undergarments sometimes.
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Shinobu Nagumo


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
HimuraBattousai wrote:


Even anime characters wash their undergarments sometimes.


True... I've never seen fanservice with dirty underwear... has that ever been done? I wonder....
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FireAza
Kiichi Goto


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Chupa Chups wrote:
Sneezing - Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it's a superstition, partiuclarly if you sneeze multiple times consecutively.

The superstition goes that someone is talking about you when you sneeze, I don't think it needs to be any set number of times. To add to what StorminNorman said about the old ladies throwing water into the street, I think back in the days when the roads were made of dirt, people would wet the roads with water to prevent them from getting dusty during the summer. No idea why they still do this on roads made from tar and gravel Razz Maybe we'll have to stick with the dirty water thing Wink
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 6:10 pm    Post subject: Re: ... Reply with quote
Inniss 1428 wrote:
Gaz wrote:
I'm surprised that 'glomp' doesn't have a description in there lol. Especially since Fri is posting in this thread.

Good idea. I myself didn't know what this meant until a few minutes ago.
Wikipedia wrote:
Glomp is a term often used by anime fans, most often used on IRC. Usually used as a verb to 'glomp' someone is usually to latch on to or hug a person quite tightly, in the style a real child might hug a much taller adult's leg tightly. Thus the hug is merely affectionate, never sexual, no matter how tight the hug is.

A glomp is also often compared to "A kind of tackle huggie" where the person will randomly run up to and tightly hug the victim of the glomp. It is common to surprise a very close friend with a glomp, but one should never randomly glomp a stranger or someone they are not extremely close to.

People often make up their own variations such as "Running Tackle Glomp" or "hugglomp". Glomping is often prevalent at anime conventions.

Though much disputed, it is commonly believed that the term "glomp" originated in Ranma fandom. While never mentioned in the series itself, it is commonly used by fans to describe the way in which the character Shampoo commonly attached herself to the main character, Ranma.

The word "glomp" comes from the sound created by such a hug, in that running up to the "glompee" is usually involved. Sometimes glomps can be "jump-hugs," or "tackle-hugs," and sometimes the person being glomped can be set off balance or even toppled over.

Some of you animé fans are weird... Laughing



Here's an idea... let's all go to the cons and have a glomp fest!
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2006 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
This is not a complete bilingual Japanese-English dictionary, it is however a list of some of the most commonly used terms in animé and manga in alphabetical order according to roomanji. Use the search function (ctrl+F) to find things easier.

A

aa, ee, un, saa = yes (informal)
abayo = casual goodbye, kinda like "see ya"
abunai = dangerous, threatening; when shouted as a command it translates to "look out!"
aburi = fried tofu
ahou = moron
ai = love
aisatsu ni = to greet, say hello to
aishiteru = I love you (romantic love)
aisuru = love, sweetheart, beloved
akari = light
aku = evil, wicked, bad, etc.
aku soku zan = literally "kill evil instantly" (from Rurouni Kenshin)
ane-ue = respectful word for "older sister"; you would use this to talk about your sister when she's not in your presence. If you were talking to her, you would use "onee-san"
ani-ue = respectful word for "older brother"; you would use this to talk about your brother when he's not in your presence. If you were talking to him, you would use "onii-san"
ano/sono/kono/dono/ = basically means "this" when referring to people. In order: "that over there", "that", "this", and "which one?"
ano hi = "this day"
ano hito = literally "that person"
ano toki = literally "that time"; often translates to "back there", "back then", etc.
anou = "well..."
ara/are = oh, or "huh?" ; "Ara" is used by women, "Are" by men.
are/sore/kore/dore = means "this" when referring to objects. Meanings are the same as listed above for "ano/sono/kono/dono"
arigatou gozaimasu = "thank you very much"; the more formal version is "domo arigatou gozaimasu"; the casual verion is "arigatou" (thanks, thank you)
arimasen/imasen = isn't ("arimashita" = was, were)
asagohan/hirugohan/bangohan = in order: breakfast/lunch/dinner/meal
ashita = tomorrow
asoko/soko/koko/doko = means "this" when referring to locations. In order: "there" (far away), "there", "here", "where?"; both "doko wa" and "koko wa" can translate as "where am I?" (literally "where is this place?")
atama = head
atarashii = new
atsui = hot (temperature or weather)


B

baka = idiot, fool, stupid, etc. (all-purpose insult)
bakaga = impossible
bakemono = monster
bento = a box lunch
betsu ni = a multi-purpose negative phrase, usually translated as "nothing" or "not really"
bishonen = beautiful boy
bishoujo = beautiful girl (sometimes translated as "pretty"; the word itself is a combination of "bi" = beautiful and "shoujo" = girl)
bouzu = kid (often used as an insult)
budo = a set of goals/morals for martial artists, such as a philosophy that goes with your particular style, such as "protect the weak" or "revitalize people" or something of that sort.
bushido = the "warrior's code", or code of honor among samurai. One of the main rules of Bushido seems to be "death before dishonor"
busu = ugly girl (a pretty rude insult)


C

chibi = little; can be a noun or adjective
chichi-oya = formal, respectful word for "father"; this is how you would refer to your father outside of his presence. If you were talking to him you would use "otou-san"
chikyuu = Earth (as in the planet)
chigau = different (can also be used as "no" as in "no, it's something different" or "that's wrong"). The verb form is "chigaimasu" ("to be different/wrong")
chiisai = small (as in "small in size"); I've also heard the variation "chisana", which may be the noun version, I'm not %100 sure on that.
chotto matte = "wait a minute!" ("matte" is the gerund from of "to wait" which is "matsu"); "chotto" = "for a short time". "chotto" actually has many different meanings, it varies according to context and I don't have a full understanding of this word yet.
clothing nouns: kimono, yukata (summer kimono), obi (sash), haori (coat), hanten (jacket), hakama (skirt pants), tabi (split-toed socks), gi (short men's kimono), zori (sandals for kimono), geta (wooden sandals), warajii (sandals with many woven straw straps for keeping it on your foot securely), manto (cloak)


D

da = as in "no da", a phrase used by Chichiri of Fushigi Yuugi. This is an example of a character using archaic Japanese; he ends almost everything he says with "no da". Chichiri says this to put more emphasis into his arguments and statements, it means something like "what I'm saying is true."
daga = however/but
daijoubu = don't worry, I'm okay, I'll be all right, etc. "daijouka" is "are you okay?"
daikon = large Japanese radish
daimyo = fuedal lord; these people were the next rank above samurai in Japan's fuedal era and were the major landowners.
daisho = traditional pair of swords carried by samurai, consisting of a katana (long sword) and wakizashi (short sword)
daisuki desu/da = I love you. This has more emphasis than "suki desu/da" which means "I love you/I like you" (this refers to boyfriend/girlfriend type love, not romantic marraige-type love. Important difference!). "daisuki" can also describe your favorite things.
dakara = so, therefore
damare = means "be quiet", often translates as "shut up!" or "silence!"
dame = this actually means "bad" or "it's no good" (the opposite of "ii", which means "good") but it's often used (and translated) as "no" (as in "don't do that!")
de gozaru = a "polite phrase" that can be added to the ends of sentences. Only Himura Kenshin of Rurouni Kenshin uses this. It's a very outdated, archaic form of the polite "de gozaimasu" and would almost be like someone walking up to you and saying stuff like "thou art" and other Shakespearan-era English. You know what it means, but you would never use it in regular converstion. Kenshin's just odd -_-;;
desu = this has many complicated uses in speech, but basically it's a polite modifier, and is a more casual form of "de gozaimasu". See a grammar dictionary for how to properly translate "desu", I could never explain it properly
demo/datte = but
densetsu = legend, legendary
dewa = an interjection, has various meanings including "Then...","Well...","Now..." etc.
dim sum = pork buns (a Chinese dish)
do-iu koto da = "what do you mean?"
dojo = school (as in a maritial arts training hall)
doki doki = a phrase meaning "sometimes/from time to time"; it also describes a heartbeat
domo = This word has so many uses I couldn't possibly list them all. One common use is "thank you", functioning as the short version of the full (i.e. very formal) version of "thank you very much" ("domo arigatou gozaimasu")
doozo = here you go, here you are (giving someone something)
dou = how, in what way?; "dou da?" is "how about it?"
dou stuff = why?/why not?/how come?; "doushita" can mean "what's wrong?"


E

eeto... = like saying "um..." or "erm...", that sort of thing
expletives: mou, che, chikuso, kuso, shimatta (all meaning damn, ****, crap, etc.)


F

fuku = uniform
fureru = "to touch"
furo = bath
futon = the thin, soft mattresses some Japanese sleep on (most people use Western beds nowadays). They are folded and stored in cabinets when not in use.
fushigi = mystery, wonder, mysterious, etc.


G

gaijin = refers to any foreigner
gakkou = highschool
gambatte ne! = "do your best!"
genki da = cheer up, be well, take care, etc. ("genki" literally means energy)
gochisousama! = said at the end of mealtimes, means "thank you for the meal/I'm finished"
gomen nasai = I'm sorry


H

ha = the cutting edge of a sword (just one of many meanings for "ha")
haha-oya = respectful word for "mother"; this is how you would refer to your mother outside of her presence. If you were talking to her you would use "okaa-san"
hai = yes
hajime = beginning, start, the first time, etc. The verb "to begin" is "hajimeru" (with the often-heard command form "hajimete")
hajimemashite = "I'm pleased to meet you (for the first time)"
hakubaikou = white plum (the scent and the flower)
han = half; examples are "hanbun" ("half of me" or "part of me") and "hanyou" ("half-demon")
hana = there are a few meanings for this, including "flower" and "nose"
hanase = imperative form of "to release", it often translates as "release me!" or "let me go!"; the dictionary form is "hanasu"
hanashi = as a noun it means "news, account, story", etc. The dictionary from of the verb "to talk" is "hanasu"; "hanasu also means "to release" (see above)
hane = spring (as in the season)
hayaku = means "faster"; also translates as "hurry up" or "quickly" when used as a command.
hen = weird or strange
hentai = literally "strange", though it's often used in such a way as to get the translation "pervert"
henshin = transform or change
hidari = left
hidoi = mean, cruel
hikari = light, energy (as in a glare, gleam, or ray)
hime = princess
himitsu = secret
hito = man, person
hitokiri = assassin; "hito" means "man" and "kire" is a form of the verb "to cut" ("kiru"), so "hitokiri" literally means "Man-Slicer" or "ManSlayer", hence why it's an appropriate job title for an assassin
hitomi = to see, eye
hitotsu no = a part of something (a, one, etc.)
honorifics: the Japanese "honorific" has no English equivalent. They are a way of showing your status in relation to another person and so, depending on how they are used, they can be either respectful or insulting. In rank from highest respect to lowest they are: -sama, -san, -dono, -kun, -chan. They are used as suffixes attached to the ends of words. There has been some debate amongst myself and others about the exact usage of "-dono" as it occurs in anime and manga; it's an older honorific and seems to imply that the speaker is in the service of another person, but this isn't always true in context. As far we can tell its usuage is on a case-by-case basis.
honto = really ("honto desu ka" = "really?")
houshi = priest


I

ichiban = first, the best, favorite, etc.; "ichi" is "one" and when the Japanese count things they use different classifiers along with the number (kind of like the way we say "two pieces of bread" instead of "two breads"). "-ban" is used specifically for counting numerical order.
ie = house
ii = good, nice; "ii desu ka" means "is it okay?", the casual version is "ii ne/na"; the past tense of "ii" is "yokatta" (yup you grammar-seekers, it's an irregular. I hate irregulars )
iie, iya = no; the first is more formal, the second more relaxed and conversational
iinazuke = fiancee
ikari = fury
ikenai = "oh no!"
iku = the dictionary form of "to go"; often you hear it as "ikuzo" meaning "let's go!" This form isn't in my grammar book, so I'm guessing it's some sort of ultra-casual slang version of the verb, but I can't be sure about that.
ima = now
imouto = younger sister
inochi = life
inu = dog
irrashimase! = welcome! (used in restaurants to greet customers)
itachi = weasel
itadakimasu = said at the start of meals, means "let's eat!", "here's to good food", etc.
ite = ouch, ow
itte kimasu = "I'm taking off!" or "I'm leaving now!"; the "itte" part of this is the gerund form of the verb "to go" ("iku") but there is no conjugation with "kimasu" on the end of it, so I'm wondering if I'm not hearing the phrase correctly...
istu = when; "istu mo" means "always, constantly, forever", etc.


J

ja ne/ja na = see you later/see you then
ja matta/mattana = casual "goodbye"
-ja nai/-nai = a suffix that gives an adjective a negative meaning. Japanese "adjectives" don't fully correspond to the English ones, you need to see a grammar book for a proper explanation of negative forms.
janken = the Japanese version of "rock, paper, scissors"; the phrase is "Janken, Janken, Pon!"
jibun = one's self, yourself/himself/herself
jikai = next time
jinchuu = Earthly justice (is also sometimes translated as "revenge")
jitsu wa = "actually..."
jou-chan = "little missy"
joudan janai ="this is no joke!" or "you've got to be kidding!", etc.
juunishi = Japanese version of the Chinese Zodiac (featured in the anime Fruits Basket)


K

ka = a particle that indicates a question
kakkoii! = "cool!"
kami = some common meanings for this word are "spirit" ("Kami-sama" is God), "hair", and "paper"
kamiya = flower; this isn't the generic word for "flower" so I'm thinking it refers to a specific species, I have no idea which one though...
kanai = wife
kanji = perception, feeling. Also refers to the Chinese characters used in Japanese writing.
kanojo = girlfriend
kao = face
kaoru = scent
kare/kareshi = boyfriend
kawaii/kawaiku ne = cute/uncute (from Ranma 1/2)
kaze = wind
keisatsu = police
ken = sword; there are many words for sword according to their type (usually determined by length). Examples: wattou (long battle katana, usually greater than 30 inches in length), katana (generally 25-30 inches long), wakizashi (short sword), kodachi (short sword between a wakizashi and katana in length), tanto (long dagger), kunai (short throwing knives), sakabatou (a fictional reverse-bladed sword), zanbatou (giant sword used to cut down both horse and rider), bokken (wooden sword), and shinai (bamboo practice sword). The sheath or scabbard for a sword is called a "saya".
kenjutsu = swordsmanship
kenkaku = swordsman
kenshin = devotion, dedication; in Rurouni Kenshin it's written with the kanji reading "Heart of Sword"
keredo/kedo = though, although, but
ki/chi = the Asian concept of a life force or life spirit; it's mentioned a lot in martial arts anime. "Ken-ki" is used in Rurouni Kenshin in reference to swords, and in Inuyasha "youki" is used to describe demon energy. "Ki" also means "tree". "Chi" is closer to the Chinese pronuciation of the word.
kimochi = feeling, emotion, pleasure
ki o tsukete = The gerund (command) form of "be careful"; dictionary form is "ki o tsukeru"
kitsune = fox
kirei = pretty, lovely; unlike in English, the Japanese word for "pretty" can also be a noun, and so sometimes you hear it as an affectionate nickname for someone.
kizu = wound (physical cut)
kodomo = child
koekeishiya = successor
koishii, koibito = beloved, lover, sweetheart, etc.
koi = this words has a ton of meanings, including love, goldfish, and "come here!" (the imperative form of the verb "to come", which is "kuru")
kokoro = heart, mind, soul, etc.
konbanwa = good evening
koneko = kitten
konnichi wa = hello, good afternoon
korosu = "to kill"
kotaeru = "to answer"; you'll hear it in various forms in anime, often as a command: "answer me!"
koto wa = thing, what, affair/matter
kotowaru = "to decline" (to refuse do something, such as fight)
kowai = scared, fear, afraid
kumo = a couple meanings, including "spider" and "cloud"


M

maa, maa = "now, now" ; a phrase used to placate someone
maa na = "I guess"
maboroshi = means "illusion", as in a dream or illusion constructed by someone; figuratively it means "mystic" or "mystical". In Escaflowne "Maboroshi no tsuki" means "The Mystic Moon."
machigainai = there's no mistake! (like when you recognize someone, or verify information)
mada = not yet, still
mamoru = "to protect"
masaka = "of course not!", "impossible", "it can't be!", "not really", etc.
massushiro = a phrase, means "clean and white"
mattaku = sheesh, yeesh, jeez, "oh for heaven's sake", etc. General expression of annoyance.
miko = priestess
minna = everyone
miru = "to see"
miso = Japanese soy-based soup
mizu = water
mochi = a Japanese dessert: rice dough (kinda marshmallow in texture) stuffed with ohagi (sweet bean paste)
moko-dono = from Ranma 1/2, means "son-in-law"
mon = family crest, often seen on formal kimono. In the Meji era a "mon" was also a form a currency that was worth less than a "sen".
mononoke = vengeful spirit
mooto = increases the amount of something. An example is "hayaku, hayaku, mooto hayaku" (a phrase from a Spirited Away image song) which means "faster, faster and faster" but "mooto" doesn't mean "and"; it's simply increasing the amount of "hayaku"
mori = forest
moshi moshi = hello (on the phone)
mou ii = a phrase, means "no more" or "that's enough!"
mune = the dull edge of a Japanese sword. It also means "heart"
musume = daughter (in Rurouni Kenshin "itachi musume" = "weasel girl" or literally the daughter of a weasel. Obviously in this case it's being used as in insult)
muzukashii = difficult
myuun = the sound a cat makes, they also make a "nyaa nyaa" sound


N

na ha = a very impolite and abbreviated way to ask someone their name. "O-namae wa" is standard-polite; if you wantto be even more formal you would use "O-namae wa nan to iimasu ka" or "O-namae wa nan to osshaimasu ka" (the latter is very polite ^^)
nakanai de = don't cry, the negative form of the verb "to cry" ("naku"). "nakanaide kudasai" = "please don't cry"
nan da/nan de = why, what. "nan da to" is an extreme version of "what", sort of like "WHAT?!"
nan de sute = "what did you say?"
nan = what; a common casual version of this is "nani"
nani yatten no = "what are you doing?"
nani-mo = nothing
naruhodo = I see (as in "I understand")
naze = why (an extreme why, as in "why did you do that?!")
ne = when put as a question, means "right?" (as in "correct"). This is just one of the many meanings of "ne"
neko = cat
nezumi/onezumi = mouse/rat
nigeru = "to run"
nihon, nippon/nihongo = Japan/Japanese (language)
nikuma = pork buns
ningen = human
nidoto = never (as in "I'll never do that again")
no = serves several purposes, often as a particle marking a possessive ("Akane no iinazuke" would be "Akane's fiancee" for instance)
numbers: ichi (one), ni (two), san (three), shi or yon (four), go (five), roku (six), shichi or nana (seven), hachi (eight), kyuu or ku (nine), juu (ten), etc.


O

obasan = aunt
obaasan = grandmother. It's important to note that this word is very different from "obasan" above (which only has one "a" in romanji or a short "a" sound in speech). The "a" sound in "obaasan" is held twice as long.
obaba = great-grandmother, or a fairly rude way of saying "old woman"
obou = monk
oden = a mixed meat/vegetable stew
ohagi = sweet bean paste
oi = hey!
oishii = delicious, tasty
ojisan = uncle, or "mister" when used by a non-relative. The Japanese have the habit of sometimes referring to strangers or aquaintances with familial terms. This is one such example.
ojiisan = grandfather. Just as with "obasan" it's important to note the difference in spelling. You hold the "i" sound longer when you want to say "grandfather" as opposed to "uncle".
okaa = mother; in speech this word is almost always used with an honorific. "Okaa-sama" is very respectful, "Okaa-san" is general respect (this is the usual form you hear), "Okaa-chan" is informal and is sort of like saying "mommy".
okari nasai = welcome home
okashira = commander or boss
okonomiyaki = Japanese "pizza" (it's similar to a pancake with sauce and other toppings added. Yum ^_^)
ohayou gozaimasu = good morning (just "ohayou" is like "morning!")
ohisashiburi = "it's been a long time" or "long time no see!"
omoshiroi = interesting or amusing
onna = woman
onegai = please (the full version is "onegai-shimasu" when you're being really polite; if used like a command I've seen it translated as "I beg of you!")
onee = older sister (informal: onee-chan, polite: onee-san
oni = ogre or demon
onii = older brother (informal: onii-chan, polite: onii-san)
onigirii = rice ball
onsen = hot spring
ooji = prince
ookii = big
osuwari = the command form of "to sit" ; actually this is technically a dog command...
otaku = in Japan this words simply refers to a fan of anything, in America it's come to describe an fan of anime specifically.
otoko = man
otou = father; in speech, just as with "okaa", this word is almost always used with an honorific. "Otou-sama" is very respectful, "Otou-san" is general respect (this is the usual form you hear), "Otou-chan" is informal and is sort of like saying "daddy".
otouto = younger brother
otto = husband
ougi = succession technique for a sword or martial arts school, literally means "deep act"
owari = "the end", as in the end of a show or story. The verb "to end" is "owaru"
oyaji = "old man", as in your dad (often used as an insult in anime)
oyasumi nasai = good night


P

paku = the sound a fish makes
pan = bread
particle: the Japanese "particle" refers to the short syllables (no, to, ni, mo, etc.) sprinked in Japanese sentences. The meaning and uses of particles are many and varied. They often serve as object and topic markers, identifying the subject of the sentence (first person pronouns are nearly always followed by a particle. Examples would be "watashi no", "sessha mo", etc.). They also serve a function similar to English preposition "filler" words such as: of, and, the, from, to, etc. To understand particles you need a Japanese grammar dictionary and/or a good textbook.
piyo = the sound a bird makes
pronouns: watakushi (formal "I"), watashi (standard "I"), atashi (young woman's "I"), ore (informal men's "I"), boku ("I" for kids or when you're being submissive), sessha ("this unworthy one"), washi (used by old people) anata (formal "you", or "beloved" if used between a married couple), kimi (standard "you"), omae (casual men's "you"), onushi ("you" used by old people), temee (rude version of "you"), kisama (really rude version of "you", as in "you bastard!")

Notes on pronoun use: generally used in pairs.

Complementary I/you pairs by politeness level! There are a lot of ways of referring to oneself, depending on gender, age, social position, and relation to the person being addressed. Usually, a person who habitually uses a given first person pronoun will use a complementary second person pronoun to address others.

Ore/omae. Ore is the tough-guy way of saying I, and a guy who says ore usually addresses other (men) as omae. Omae *used* to be polite, it literally means something like honorable-one-in-front-of-me, but usage tends to drag down second (and sometimes first) person pronouns to lower and lower politeness levels. Anime characters who use it: Sanosuke, Yahiko, Battousai, Ranma, Ryouga -- tough guys in general.

Boku/kimi. Boku is the boy's I, used almost from the time a boy becomes aware that he is a boy, up until he decides he's a M-A-N and starts using ore. Kimi is the complementary you; most boku-users seem to use it. Boku-users in anime usually tend to be softer-spoken -- though why Tatewaki Kunou uses it is a mystery, since most of the rest are nice guys: Tenchi Masaki, Tonbo in Kiki's Delivery Service, Hakkai in Gensoumaden Saiyuuki.

Watashi/anata. Standard-polite, used by nearly all adults who don't talk tough.

Atashi/anta. This is a young girl's version of standard-polite and is a little more casual. Akane Tendou uses this.

Washi. I don't remember the complementary you for this; it's a form used by old people. Happousai, Cologne, and Genma use it (even though Genma's not that old).

Sessha/onushi. This unworthy one... and onushi means something like honored lord. Again, both are around 300 years out of date. And we all know who uses these! ^_^x

Then there are two other words for you that I should mention. At least technically they mean you -- they're usually used as epithets: kisama and temee (that's the rough-masculine pronunciation, but it's the only one I ever see). In Japanese, most curses, epithets and insults are simply very rude ways of saying you.


R

rei = soul
rounin = masterless samurai
rurouni = vagabond or wanderer (it's important to note that this word was made up by the creator of Rurouni Kenshin, combining "rounin" (masterless samurai) and "rurou" (vagabond). It doesn't actually exist in the Japanese language)
ryu = school or style (for example, a sword style such as "Hiten Misturugi Ryu").
ryuu = dragon


S

sake = rice "wine" (it's brewed like a beer)
sakura = cherry blossom
samurai = Japan's ancient warrior class (one step above peasants), officially abolished at the start of the Meji era (1868)
sashimi = sliced raw fish
sasuga ha = "nothing less from", as when someone lives up to his/her reputation or does something cool that you expected
satsujinhan-nin = killer/murder; "satsujin" is a shorter version.
sayounara = farewell (as in "goodbye forever" or for a long time)
seiyuu = voice actor/actress
sen = a breakdown of Japanese currency, in today's money I believe 100 sen = 1 yen (not %100 sure though)
sensei = teacher; it's often used as a suffix after someone's name and indicates that they are very knowledgeble in a certain area (doctors, teachers, and writers often get a "-sensei" after their name). In America "sensei" has a more limited definition as a "martial arts instructor".
shishou = old term for "master" in the martial arts
senshi = soldier
sempai = upperclassmen/predecessor; essentially someone who has studied or been there before you
sepukku = ritual suicide
shakkin = debt (as in money)
shihondai = assistant master
shikari stuff = generally translated as "hang in there! or "snap out of it!". "shikari shiro" is the informal male speech version. The literal "snap out of it" is "ii kagen ni shinasai/ii kagen ni shiro" (male speech); it kind of means "behave yourself!"
shikashi = however/but
shinda = "died"; this is the plain past tense of "shinu", which means "to die".
shinji = form of the verb "to believe" ("shinjiru"). You hear the verb in its various forms everywhere in anime, but I've only heard "shinji" as a name (from Evangelion). I'm not sure of its precise meaning in that form.
shinjitsu = truth
shinma = literally "gods" + "demons", used to describe the supernatural beings in Vampire Princess Miyu
shinpai = worry
Shinto/Shintoism = the native religion of Japan. Shintoism consists mainly of ancestor worship and the worship of various animal spirits. Shinto temples are distinguished by the large orange-red "Tori" gates placed outside the main temple (these are commonly seen in anime).
shitsure shimasu = lit. "please excuse what I am about to do". It's what you say when you enter someone else's house.
shogun = warlord
shoji = the sliding rice paper doors in Japanese houses
shounen = boy
shoujo = girl
sonna = such
soo = so (the one word that's the same in Japanese and English)
sore = that
soredemo = however/but
soro soro = soon, "it's almost time", "it is time for...", etc. This phrase has a lot of translations, it's hard to pin down a precise meaning.
soshite = and
sou ka = I see or "do I?" (the ka indicates a question)
sou na = no, as in "no, that can't be!" or "no way!"
sou desu ne = yes it is; "sou sou" can mean "oh yeah..."
so-yo = that's true, that's right!
subete = all, everything
sugoi! = awesome!, cool!, wow!, etc.
suhama = rice cake
sukoshi = literally "to a small degree"; usual translations: a bit, few, slight, slightly, little, some, any
sumanu/sumanai/sumimasen = "pardon me" or "excuse me", also translates to "I'm sorry" or even "thank you"; this word has so many variations.
suru = "to do"; "nani o suru?" = "what are you doing?"
sushi = we all know this one, rice topped with raw fish (or some other kind of sea life) and wrapped in seaweed


T

tabun = probably
taberu = "to eat"
-tachi = when added to things, makes them plural ("hito-tachi" = "folk, people" for example). When used with first and second person pronouns -tachi can make words that mean we/our and "you guys"; ore/boku/watashi-tachi all mean "we/our" and "omeatachi" means "you guys", essentially referring to a group of people (see notes on pronoun use above).
tadaima = I'm home, I'm back, etc.
taichou = captain, commander
taisetsu na/ni = important (as in "this is very important/special to me")
tamago = egg
tamashii = soul; In Inuyasha "Shikon no Tama" means "Jewel of the Four Souls"
tanuki = raccoon (the Japanese raccoon dog, actually)
taousu = defeat (in battle)
tasukete = help
tataku = to hit, beat, or knock.
tatami = the straw mats that cover floors in traditional Japanese homes
tattaka = fight/battle
tatte = command form of "to stand up"; dictionary form is "tatsu"
tempura = deep-fried vegetables
tenchuu = divine or heavenly justice (from Rurouni Kenshin)
tenshi = angel
to = a particle, means "and" when linking two words
tori = bird, also refers specifically to a chicken or rooster; "tori no atama" = "rooster head" (from Rurouni Kenshin)
tsubasa = wings; a single wing is called a "hane"
tsuee = strong, as in "he's strong"
tsugi = next
tsuki = moon (as in the satellite)
tsuzuku = a phrase, "to be continued"
tsuyoi = strong, powerful


U

udon = a kind of Japanese noodle
unmei = fate or destiny
usagi = rabbit
urasai! = "shut up!" or just "be quiet"
ureshii = happy
uso = lie


W

wai! = yay!
wakaru/wakatta/wakarimashita = various forms of "to understand" ("wakaru")
wakaranai = common negative form of "to understand"
wan = the sound a dog makes
writing: the Japanese written system is very complicated and consists of three separate scripts that are used together: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji.

Hiragana is the Japanese native script and consists of 46 basic characters. Hiragana is a syllabary rather than an alphabet (ka, ki, ko, ku, etc.) so English words cannot be neatly transcribed into Hiragana or vice versa. "Romanji" is the Japanese term for native words written in the English alphabet. Several systems exists for transcribing Japanese words into English script, the most common of which is the Hepburn system.

Katakana is also 46 characters and has the same sounds as Hiragana, but is used primarily for writing foreign words and for emphasis (similar to the way we use bold or italic characters).

Kanji are Chinese characters that have been adapted for the Japanese language. There are literally thousands of different Kanji, and much of Japanese is written in them. Kanji are often used for proper nouns (such as names and places) and also distinguish between homonyms (which are very common in Japanese). Earlier in this glossary I mentioned that "koi" is a homonym word with many meanings. In speech, the meaning is determined by context, in writing a different Kanji will be used for each meaning of koi so you know exactly which one the author means (not a bad system, actually). In manga that are read by kids, you'll often see the Kanji written with tiny Hiragana symbols (called "furigana") on the side. This is because children in Japan gradually learn their Kanji as they go through school, and so if they come across an unfamiliar one they need to know how to pronounce it (hence the Hiragana, which they already know). Full literacy in Japan is very difficult, which is why reading and writing is so imporant to them. Japanese kids spend most of your primary education learning Kanji, and they're so stringent about it Japan has one of the highest literacy rates in the world (96%!) For a fantastic and extremely informative site on Kanji and the Japanese writing system in general, please visit The Kanji SITE.


Y

yahari/yappari = literally "as expected"; usally translated as "as I thought", "just as I suspected", "you really are", "can it be that you're?", etc.
yakisoba = pan-fried noodles ("soba" are buckwheat noodles)
yakitori = skewered barbecured chicken
yakusoku = promise
yamete/yamero = casual command forms of "to stop"; "yamete" is feminine usage, "yamero" masculine
yare yare = oh well, "oh brother", etc.
yarou = very casual way of saying "guy"; often it's used as insult, in which case it's translated as "you jerk" or "bastard!", etc.
yatta! = he/she/I did it!
yatto = finally
yen = Japanese money; although the exact exchange rate varies day by day, 100 yen usually equals 1 U.S. dollar. In the 19th century (i.e. the Meji era) a yen, much like our dollar, was worth considerably more, around 100 dollars!
yo = just as in English, this is a really casual greeting. As a particle in Japanese speech, "yo" adds emphasis to a word or statement (in some cases, it acts like an exclamation point as far as meaning's concerned)
yokai = "roger!"
yokatta = an expression of relief, this is the past tense of "ii" ("good); it literally means "that was good" but it usually translates as "I'm so glad" or "thank goodness"
yosha! = "all right", "let's go", "let's do it!", etc.
youma/youkai = demon
yowai = weak
yume = dream
yuurei = ghost
yuki = snow
yurusenai! = "I won't allow/permit it!", "I can't forgive this!", etc.; "to forgive/pardon" is "yurusu"


Z

zenzen = a negative modifier, basically means "at all", in use is translates as "that wasn't good at all" or "that was a bad/unfortunate thing"
zettai! = absolutely!/definitely! This phrase can be translated many, many ways; it basically acts as empahsis to make another word seem stronger.




Kudos to my friend Mercutio from ZU for doing most of the original compiling. Personally I've found this to be a very handy list.
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Cobizah
Linn Syun-Rock Dreu Haider Jinto


Joined: 08 Oct 2005
Posts: 2214

PostPosted: Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
h.o.l.y.c.r.a.p.

Thanks! Very Happy
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mi
Motoko Kusanagi


Joined: 21 Feb 2006
Posts: 879
Location: Brisbane

PostPosted: Mon Apr 03, 2006 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
skate_mate wrote:
This is not a complete bilingual Japanese-English dictionary, it is however a list of some of the most commonly used terms in animé and manga in alphabetical order according to roomanji.


I could practically read a japanese manga now lol

Your list is awsome!!

I agree with Cobizah...

Cobizah wrote:
h.o.l.y.c.r.a.p.

Thanks! Very Happy

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