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Common Anime Terms.



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Common Anime Terms.
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jestermasterx
Lin Minmay


Joined: 11 Feb 2004
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2004 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
What is a fandub?
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Remxi
Misa Amane


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2004 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
A fandub is when a bunch of anime fans get together and dub the anime in English. Like fansubbing, except they put their voices on it rather than just subtitles. It's not very widespread, except at conventions, where there are muck around fandub competitions.
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jestermasterx
Lin Minmay


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2004 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
That's what I thought...Except that it would mess up the entire thing.
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tekkenite
Washu Hakubi


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2004 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Does "tankoubon" just mean volume (for manga), or is it something to do with the manga being so popular that extra volumes are created?
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Remxi
Misa Amane


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Just means volume, although I think the name is related to the dimensions of the graphic novel. They are often referred to as just "tanks".
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Bing
Cagalli Yula Attha


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Remxi wrote:
Just means volume, although I think the name is related to the dimensions of the graphic novel. They are often referred to as just "tanks".

Seeing some of those volumes, you could use them for tank amour Smile
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mib
Ayeka Masaki Jurai


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I see to recall that tankoubon (単行本) just translates as "collected volume". I.e., it's a collection of manga stories that were originally published individually in monthly magazines.

- mib
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Kei
Shiina Tamai


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2004 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
As per Remxi's request, I'd like to add that the plural of anime is actually anime.

This also applies for seiyuu.
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mib
Ayeka Masaki Jurai


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2004 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
keitaro_urashima wrote:
This also applies for seiyuu.


On what evidence do you make this judgement?

- mib
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Simulacrum
Hajime Saitou


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2004 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
mib wrote:
keitaro_urashima wrote:
This also applies for seiyuu.


On what evidence do you make this judgement?

- mib


Japanese doesn't really have plurals (as far as I can tell), so keitaro_urashima's comment is probably accurate.
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2004 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Simulacrum wrote:
mib wrote:
keitaro_urashima wrote:
This also applies for seiyuu.


On what evidence do you make this judgement?

- mib


Japanese doesn't really have plurals (as far as I can tell), so keitaro_urashima's comment is probably accurate.


It's not a question of japanese; it's a question of what sort of plural marking the word "seiyuu" has as an english word[1].

*All* english nouns have number, incidently; it's just that in some cases the marking on the noun itself is null [the sheep is eating vs the sheep are eating; singular vs plural, but the noun isn't marked. You can do similar sample sentences with "seiyuu"[2], if you like]

A quick google search revealled c3140 english-language pages containing the word "seiyuus", and 93800 words for "seiyuu". Compare this with "plumber"; 926 000 singular, 2 270 000 plural. "seiyuus" is thus unusually uncommon for a bona-fide english plural, compared with the singular. "Actor" [7 970 000 sing, 7 100 000 pl] is more even, but whichever way you slice it, "seiyuus" is uncommon enough to suggest that it's "wrong".

[1] <assertion>all words used in english are ipso facto english words</assertion>. I can justify this, but don't want to have to.

[2] But not, interestingly, with "anime", which may be a mass noun. Or something similar.
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mib
Ayeka Masaki Jurai


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2004 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
My understanding is that "anime" is a mass noun. Hence you cannot have "an anime", but you can have "anime", "an anime series", or "an episode of anime" , etc.

"Seiyuu" doesn't seem like a mass noun to me (though maybe it is), so that's why I queried when a link was made between the pluralisation of it and the pluralisation of "anime".

Since usage is as good a guide as any in such matters, I guess the plural of "seiyuu" is "seiyuu" in English.

- mib

p.s. I note with interest though that several English dictionaries give the plural of "kimono" as "kimonos", which scuttles the "Japanese doesn't have plurals so you shouldn't add 's' to Japanese loan words" theory.
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Trunk's Girl
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 29, 2004 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
mib wrote:

p.s. I note with interest though that several English dictionaries give the plural of "kimono" as "kimonos", which scuttles the "Japanese doesn't have plurals so you shouldn't add 's' to Japanese loan words" theory.


I still stick by this though.
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 29, 2004 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
mib wrote:
My understanding is that "anime" is a mass noun. Hence you cannot have "an anime", but you can have "anime", "an anime series", or "an episode of anime" , etc.


Not quite:
The anime I have seen has mostly been porn
The anime I have seen have mostly been porn

English verbs agree in number with their subject; the principal verb in the above sentences is "has/have". So "anime" can be a plural, or appears to be usable as a plural, so it's not a straightforward mass noun like "rice" or "sand":
The rice I have eaten has mostly been undercooked
*The rice I have eaten have mostly been undercooked.

In general, though, yes; "anime" is usually used as a mass noun.

mib wrote:

"Seiyuu" doesn't seem like a mass noun to me (though maybe it is), so that's why I queried when a link was made between the pluralisation of it and the pluralisation of "anime".


It's not, and you can tell the same way [plural marking on verbs]. "the seiyuu on Iczer-3 are mostly bad, with some [the lead character, for example] being quite bad."

mib wrote:

Since usage is as good a guide as any in such matters, I guess the plural of "seiyuu" is "seiyuu" in English.

- mib


Usage is the only guide to english as it's actually used; I personally have little interest in forms of english that aren't actually used.

mib wrote:

p.s. I note with interest though that several English dictionaries give the plural of "kimono" as "kimonos", which scuttles the "Japanese doesn't have plurals so you shouldn't add 's' to Japanese loan words" theory.


It's a stupid theory. The premise, while true, is irrelevant to the context, unless you think that english words in japanese should inflect as in english.

The conclusion may very well be true, but it's not explained thereby.
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2004 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Miko.
Normal english translation is "shrine maiden", but this is a label, not an equivalent. A miko is, for practical purposes, a girl or young woman who hangs around a shrine[1], wearing cool-looking red hakama and white uwagi[2], and doing a lot of sweeping, and occasionally doing a spot of occultism. They're supposed to be virgins, but I doubt many people ask.

The theory is slightly more complex. A miko is not technically speaking a priestess; priests act as intermediaries between men and gods [that is, relay the messages of god to humanity, and convey the prayers of humanity to the gods]. Instead, they *serve* the gods; cleaning, dancing, stuff.

There's another, probably older, tradition, of the miko as an ecstatic prophetess or occultist; possessed by, and speaking in the words of, a deity. This is not an uncommon phenomenon, but one you'll see in many religions[3], or certain sorts of mediums.

[1] Shrine is shintou, temple is buddhist; this is worth remembering. As another thing, buddhism [like modern judaism and islam but unlike most branches of christianity] doesn't technically *have* a priesthood; anybody can in principle talk to the divine and be answered. Buddhist monks are specially trained at this, but not otherwise qualified. Technically.
[2] hakama are traditional japanese trousers, incredibly loose-fitting. An uwagi is as the name implies an upper-body covering, looks a lot like a kimono.
[3] For example, the oracle at delphi [possessed by apollo], or voudoun, or modern pentecostal christians [although in that case, and in the somewhat more subdued case of quakers, any member of the communion could be possessed rather than a specific individual; pentecostalists and quakers don't have priests either].
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RoninAquila
Yakumo Tsukamoto


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2004 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Terms Of Address: Self

Good afternoon and welcome to Forms Of Address Lesson 1: Self.

Now, notice how there is a myriad of ways of saying "I" in Anime and Japanese movies? That is because the mere change of an inflection can indicate the social background, position and the entire presonality of the person in question.

Not convinced? Read on:

Watashi: The gender neutral, all purpose, mature and polite way of saying I. But bear in mind that it is most often used by Middle Aged Men, "Traditional" Girls/Women and polite men. Considered unecessarily, but not offensively, polite when used amongst a circle of young blokes. Examples: Aeyaka Jurai of Tenchi Muyo. Kanzaki Sumire of Sakura Wars.
Lafielle of Crest OF The Stars.

Atashi: An energetic, "cute girl" way of saying "I." Also used by energetic and/or ditzy 20's and by the occasional Tomboy.
Examples: Tanazaki Yukari of Azumanga Daioh. Seras Victoria of Hellsing. Multi HMX12 of To Heart.

Boku: A "gentleman's way" of a man addressing himself. Note that it is more often than not used by little boys under the age of 14, and anyone above that age using this form of address is: 1) A True Gentleman. 2) A Pansie. 3) A Sensitive New Age Guy.
Examples: Kira Yamato of Gundam Seed. Seta Soujiro of Ruroni Kenshin. Jinto of Crest Of The Stars.

Do note also this is a form of address used by "non-violent" Tomboys to reflect their somewhat masculine yet still sweet and kind nature. Example: Lime Of Saber Marionette.

Ore (Pronounced OLE) : On the surface, this is the "rude" way of saying "I." However, it is rather the "informal way." For our purposes, let's just call it the "macho" way of male-self-address. It is used by 1) Men who are comfortable and secure with their masculinity. 2) Insecure Men Trying to reinforce their adequacy. 3) Gangsters and violent high-school boys. 4) Tomboys who really reject any sign of femininity in their being.

For an example of the context of how "Ore" is used, here's two situations, each said in two different forms:

1 Boku Wa Michale, Yoroshiku. = My name is Michael, Pleased to meet you.

Ore Wa Micahel, Yoroshiku. = I'm Mike, Nice to meet you Mate.


2 Omae wa Watashi Ga Taosu!! = I am going to defeat you!!

Omae wa Ore Ga Taosu = I'm gonna kick yer ass, you bastard!!

Examples: Vegeta of Dragonball Z. Athran Zara of Gundam Seed. Hiko Seijuro of Ruroni Kenshin. Saotome Ranma (Both Genders) or Ranma 1/2. Pran of Record Of The Lodoss Wars. Gokajo Statsuki of Happy Lesson. Alucard Of Hellsing. And The list goes on forever and ever.

Next Time: Terms Of Address. "You." Cool
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Kei
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2004 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Wouldn't it be "yoroshiku onegai shimasu"?
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Willow
Hajime Saitou


Joined: 25 Jul 2003
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2004 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Japanese does have plurals.
A simple example:
person = hito
people = hitobito

Its generally just a repetition of the same Kanji. Not always tho.
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RoninAquila
Yakumo Tsukamoto


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2004 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Also:

Omae= You.

Omaera= You People.
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Nargun
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2004 12:57 pm    Post subject: OOSAKABEN [and related matters] Reply with quote
[the following assumes some knowledge of spoken japanese, because it's impossible to write any other way].

Oosakaben is the dialect of japanese commonly spoken in and around the city of Osaka, in eastern japan. It's marked by a number of distinctive syntactic features, of which some follow:
copula "ya" instead of "da"
emphatic particle "de" instead of "yo" or "zo"
"chau" instead of "ja nai"
"-te oru/-toru" rather than "-te iru/-teru"
"-hen" or "-n" for "-nai"
among others. Among a *lot* of others. Also, both standard japanese and oosakaben have a pitch accent, but the details are significantly different.

Kyoutoben, spoken in kyoto [spot a pattern yet?], is a close relative of oosakaben [they're both in the kansaiben dialect family], but sounds generally "softer" and has the distinctive "dosu" copula [instead of std japanese "da/desu" or oosaka "ya"].

Sometimes you'll hear characters with heavilly-rolled Rs, and who say "nee" instead of "nai"; this is the traditional accent of Edo, modern tokyo, although most inhabitants of Tokyo are descended from migrants and natively speak standard japanese.

Ryukyuan [still spoken in much of Okinawa-ken] is a close relative of japanese but is regarded as a seperate language; the islands themselves were not formally annexed to japan until 1870-odd, in the post-meiji shakeup. Apparently, the "comic-book chinese" "velly solly" accent you hear from such people as the juusenkyo guide and so forth is in fact based on forms spoken in Okinawa, although whether this refers to ryukuan proper or okinawa-accented japanese is unclear.

There are a large number of other dialects [modern standard japanese is essentially an invention of the post-meiji reformers], but I don't know enough about them, and they don't often turn up in anime [can anyone tell me where _Only Yesterday_ is set?. Most of the variation is in the west of the country, as much of the land north of Tokyo wasn't settled by Japanese speakers until 700-800AD or so.

Ainu is still spoken in Hokkaidou, but it's not in a particularly healthy state. Ainu is not related to Japanese, and I know very very little about the language.
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mib
Ayeka Masaki Jurai


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2004 1:35 pm    Post subject: Re: OOSAKABEN [and related matters] Reply with quote
Nargun wrote:
can anyone tell me where _Only Yesterday_ is set?


Yamagata prefecture, in northern Japan, I believe. (And Toyko too, obviously.)

- mib
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Trunk's Girl
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
RoninAquila wrote:

Watashi: ... Examples: Kanzaki Sumire of Sakura Wars.


I'm going to have to double-check, but I'm pretty sure Sumire uses the very feminine "watakushi" to address herself. (Cherry from Saber Marionette J uses it as well).
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
"watakushi" is not "feminine". Well, it is, but more significantly it's highly formal.

Someone who calls themselves "watakushi" likely also covers their mouth when they're laughing. And so forth.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'll add a note of my own, I've noticed that Watashi seems to be the word of choice in ballady jpop songs. The singers that come to mind who I've heard use it are Ayumi Hamasaki and Kokia, but there are plenty more... I suppose more emotional stuff requires more formality? *shrugs* it sounds nice so that's all that matters I suppose Razz
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Paul Eye
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2004 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Pardon me, but being a huge fan of both the anime and manga, I couldn't help noticing that this entry needs some correction:
Quote:
Ghibli - ... Titles like Nausicaa of the Valley of Wind ...

Nausicań of the Valley of Wind is, contrary to the (mis)beliefs of lots and lots of people, not a Studio Ghibli film. Miyazaki, yes; Studio Ghibli, no. The success of this film opened up the gates for Miyazaki and Takahata to found Studio Ghibli. So you might want to rephrase that entry.
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StorminNorman
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2004 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
While true, it is part of the Ghibli catalogue, and they certainly own the rights to it.

It also most definitely "feels" like a Ghibli film, if nothing else.

I am also a big Nausicaa fan.
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2004 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mr Waffle wrote:
I'll add a note of my own, I've noticed that Watashi seems to be the word of choice in ballady jpop songs. The singers that come to mind who I've heard use it are Ayumi Hamasaki and Kokia, but there are plenty more... I suppose more emotional stuff requires more formality? *shrugs* it sounds nice so that's all that matters I suppose Razz


OK. There appears to be some confusion here.

The japanese language marks pronouns for the following features, orthogonally [that is, a word can be marked for any set of these attributes]:
1: Formality [which has to do with the circumstances of use]
2: "politeness" [humble/honourific; has to do with what the word refers to]. Most normal speech is *not* marked for politeness, it's a technical term. Absence of politeness marking shouldn't be read as meaning "rude".
3: Sex of user.

"Watashi" is marked for formality and politeness. It's *not* overtly marked for sex, except that women are more likely to use formal and polite language. "watakushi" is the same, but more so. Both can be freely be used by heterosexual males without raising eyebrows, although "watakushi" is highly formal and is only used by males [and normal females] under very specific circumstances [butlers and majordomos commonly use watakushi].

On the other hand, something like "atai" [UY's Benten, Shayla-Shalya from EH] or "uchi" [common for kansaiben-speaking females] *is* explicitly marked for sex, although they are neither polite nor formal. Or "ore", which is explicitly male.
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jinsenblade
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PostPosted: Tue May 04, 2004 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
That's a great list. I noticed Production I.G. is not listed (I may have missed it...It's kind of late).

And can you please explain the excessive use of blood in mostly samurai anime? Is it a homage to Lone Wolf and Cub movies of the 70s or is it more due to the fact that it is now a stylised element that it is an established anime institution?

I think I have the answer, but some more light shed on this topic would be ideal to explain it to anime newbies.
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Sailor Apollo
Koishi Herikawa


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PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
StorminNorman wrote:
Otaku actually means "house" apparently, but is used to refer to someone who never actually leaves same (and who commonly has the physical dimensions of same). Basically it was a derogatory term applied to geeks and nerds of all kinds, including anime fans.

Unfortunately, a notorious serial killer, who referred to himself as an otaku, and who was a big anime fan, started killing schoolgirls and posing them in scenes from his favourite hentai. Ever since, the term has had really negative connotations, and is not something you'd willingly refer to yourself as.

Incidentally, this particular event is also one of the reasons that anime is nowhere near as popular in Japan now as it was in the 1980s.



I think we should also note that this freak of nature also unfortunately shared a family name with a prolific anime director.
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Unforgiven
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PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
This is a list from my reader "Modern Japanese Texts".

Words that can indicate I:
watakushi 私
watashi 私
kochira こちら
boku 僕 (boys and men)
jibun 自分
ore 俺 (slang)
atashi あたし (women)
atai あたい (women/slang)
washi わし (elder men)
oira おいら (slang)
oresama 俺様 (slang)
ora おら (slang/dialect)
wate わて (Osaka-dialect)
wai わい (elder men/dialect)
asshi あっし (archaic)
temae 手前 (archiac)
sessha 拙者 (archaic)
soregashi 某 (archaic)
midomo 身共 (archiac)
ware 我 (archaic)

Words that can indicate you:
anata-sama 貴方様
sochira-sama そちら様
sochira そちら
anata あなた (貴方/貴男/貴女)
otaku お宅
kimi 君
anta あんた (slang)
omae お前 (slang)
temee てめえ (slang)
kisama 貴様 (slang)
onore おのれ (slang)
kiden 貴殿 (archaic)
kikou 貴公 (archaic)
onushi お主 (archaic)
unu うぬ (archaic)
sonata そなた (archaic)
sokomoto そこもと (archaic)
sochi そち (archaic)
omae-san お前さん (archaic)
nanji 汝 (archaic)

It doesn't have such an extensive list of "he/she", but here are a few:
kare 彼 (he)
kanojo 彼女 (she)
anohito あの人 (he/she, literally "that person")
anokata あの方 (he/she, literally "that person", polite)

As remarked, Japanese does have plurals, but they are rarely used. Personal pronouns are a situation where they are used though. The most common plural suffixes are:
tachi 達
ra 等
gata 方

These form the following commonly used plural forms (not a complete list):
We:
watashitachi 私達
bokutachi 僕達
bokura 僕等

You (plural):
anatagata あなた方
anatatachi あなた達
kimitachi 君達

They:
karera 彼等
anohitotachi あの人達
anokatatachi あの方達
anokatagata あの方々
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jestermasterx
Lin Minmay


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2004 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
What do words like -san, -chan, etc. mean? I know they're basically equivalent to Mr, Mrs, etc., but what are the others and which one means what?

Also, what is the difference between:
- Ninjutsu, chakra, jutsu
- Ninja, Shinobi
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 2004 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
jestermasterx wrote:
What do words like -san, -chan, etc. mean? I know they're basically equivalent to Mr, Mrs, etc., but what are the others and which one means what?

Also, what is the difference between:
- Ninjutsu, chakra, jutsu
- Ninja, Shinobi


LOL somebody has been watching Naruto Razz

Jutsu basically means technique. I think this is discussed in one of the Naruto threads, along with the other things. Ninja is the generic term while Shinobi is a specific clan or role regarding ninjas, I think... I'm sure there are plenty of people who know all about it Razz
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supra
Kenshin Himura


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 2004 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
jestermasterx: Check this link out

*link removed* sorry, no linking to sites to download anime please. - Slykura
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 23, 2004 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
jestermasterx wrote:
What do words like -san, -chan, etc. mean? I know they're basically equivalent to Mr, Mrs, etc., but what are the others and which one means what?

Also, what is the difference between:
- Ninjutsu, chakra, jutsu
- Ninja, Shinobi


忍者. Ninja.
忍. Shinobi.

Shinobu is a verb meaning "to sneak or hide"; shinobi is an agent form, one who sneaks[1]. Ninja is the same thing, but with chinese-style [on'yomi] pronunciation and word order. ninja and shinobi are different words for the same thing.

A jutsu is a technique, specifically the practical application of skills[2]. A ninjutsu is a jutsu used by shinobi, or possibly a jutsu that allows you to sneak; doesn't make much real-world difference.

Titles are much harder to explain. They "really" don't mean "anything"; functionally, they're grammatical markers, much like prepositions. What they encode is the social relationships between speaker, listener, and subject. I'll see if I can't whip up something later.

[1] Actually it's the ren'youkei, which means it's a fairly bland noun. In *this* case, it's an agent form, just like hitogoroshi or omawari-san.
[2] This distinction matters if you're muttering about the relationship between jutsu and dou, "way". But to the best of my knowledge, noone thinks much about nindou, so it's sorta irrelevant.
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HimuraBattousai
Kagami Yagami


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 24, 2004 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Nargun wrote:
This distinction matters if you're muttering about the relationship between jutsu and dou, "way". But to the best of my knowledge, noone thinks much about nindou, so it's sorta irrelevant.


It is, however, relevant when you talk about kendo and kenjutsu. They are quite different, and too many people are under the mistaken impression that all Japanese swordsmanship is kendo.
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Miyuki
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2004 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
jestermasterx wrote:
What do words like -san, -chan, etc. mean? I know they're basically equivalent to Mr, Mrs, etc., but what are the others and which one means what?


This is quite difficult to explain...as it's very hard to generalise which suffix should be used when and they really don't have a direct english translation.

-san I've seen is sometimes translated as Mr. or Mrs but it's not really used the way english speakers use Mr or Mrs. Rather it's a suffix used if you don't really know much about the person your talking to, if it's a formal situation...It's quite a neutral suffix.

-chan is a basically a baby talk version of -san. You see girls use it because most don't mind the cute connotations it carries but boys might not like it for that reason. Older people may or may not use it depending on the relationship, the situation, among other things. Whatever the case it's used in a mainly casual setting and it can also be used to annoy other people because it's a childish suffix (if you've ever watched Kenshin, Yahiko hates the -chan suffix with a passion because it's really childish and he wants to grow up into a man).

Suffixes however are not usually used when referring to your name or your family's names. These suffixes aren't usually bound by rules set in stone which is why it hard to explain their use sometimes.

I'm too tired to cover the others but basically using the wrong suffix in the wrong situation can be quite bad and annoy the person your talking to, making it seem like you know nothing about Japanese culture.
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Knight of L-sama
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2004 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Using san though will generally avoid too much trouble. Rare would be the situation you'd run into where you'd need to use one of the more respectful honourifics.

Other common honourifics:

kun: I call it the casual dimunitive. Commonly used between high school aged males between themselves. Also used to younger males who are too old to use chan with and from superiors to underlings of either gender, but never the other way around (or at least not on the clock)

sama: The high honourific and properly only used to indicate the absolute highest level of respect. Members of the Imperial family are one example of whom the sama suffix would be appropriate. Also used some what inappropriately by the hordes of screaming fanboys and fangirls for their favourite idol.

dono: An archaic form not generally used today outside period pieces with a level of respect that falls somewhere between sama and san. Kenshin uses it towards Kaoru for one example.
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Miyuki
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2004 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Remxi wrote:
Trunk's Girl wrote:
yaoi - rather graphic boy-on-boy love. Somebody else can post up what it stands for because I can't remember.


IIRC, it stands for something that translates to No Mountain, No Climax, No Point. That is in reference to the fact that most Yaoi focuses mainly on the shounen-ai bit, and leaves out the story (hence "No Point").

I probably didn't make much sense there. Someone else here explained it much better (perhaps it was Queenie).


You are almost correct.

The correct breakdown of the yaoi acronym is:

yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi.

yama nashi- No mountain is correct, but what it refers to as a mountain is a story's climax (like the peak of a mountain)

ochi nashi- literally "No resolution/point"

imi nashi- literally "No meaning"

So altogether it's "No climax, no point, no meaning." This is back when yaoi was just all about creating a story (or excuse) so that a fan's two favourite male characters can have sex...obviously the genre has evolved a bit since then.[/b]
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mib
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2004 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
What, nobody mentions the "Yamete! Oshiri itai!" / "Stop! My ass hurts!" explanation? Disappointing.

- mib
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HimuraBattousai
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2004 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
yaoi: An acronym for YAma-nashi, Ochi-nachi, Imi-nashi, meaning: 'no climax (to the story), no plot, no meaning (to the story)'. To the Japanese, yaoi means all sex/adult stories (aka 'hentai' to english speakers). To english-speakers, yaoi means 'boy/boy' romance or sex stories.

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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 20, 2004 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Nargun wrote:
Or "ore", which is explicitly male.


Unless you're Hinagiku from Wedding Peach.

short hair: check!
green hair: check!
Tomboy: check!
Magical girl: check!
Voiced by Miyamura Yuuko: check!

It's almost like someone was poking in the "top secret list of things that nargun likes in female anime characters"; all she needs is an oosaka accent and a giant robot. Ew.
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Melbourne Mew Mew
Shinobu Nagumo


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2004 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Nargun wrote:
Nargun wrote:
Or "ore", which is explicitly male.


Unless you're Hinagiku from Wedding Peach.

short hair: check!
green hair: check!
Tomboy: check!
Magical girl: check!
Voiced by Miyamura Yuuko: check!

It's almost like someone was poking in the "top secret list of things that nargun likes in female anime characters"; all she needs is an oosaka accent and a giant robot. Ew.


Well, I've heard there is a bonus/parody episode where the Wedding Peach girls get a giant robot. I haven't heard anything about an Osaka-ben for Hinagiku, but reportedly she does get to use the Kamehameha from DBZ in said parody.
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Rob the Fox
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2004 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Nargun wrote:
A jutsu is a technique, specifically the practical application of skills[2]. A ninjutsu is a jutsu used by shinobi, or possibly a jutsu that allows you to sneak; doesn't make much real-world difference.


Well, to be more direct, jutsu means "art" or "practice of". Ninjutsu is the "Practice of being a Ninja" or "Ninja's Artform". It can mean technique, but only in the sense that kuso can mean a number of expletives even though it really means damn or darn.
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Mad Anime Fan
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2004 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Interesting list.
A curious thought that came from the list here, is there a list on the Madman boards which list all the animation companies from Japan?
Like Studio Gibli, Toei and all the other ones?
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Remxi
Misa Amane


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2004 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mad Anime Fan wrote:
Interesting list.
A curious thought that came from the list here, is there a list on the Madman boards which list all the animation companies from Japan?
Like Studio Gibli, Toei and all the other ones?


You can find a very cluttered version of this over here.
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Mad Anime Fan
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2004 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Remxi wrote:
Mad Anime Fan wrote:
Interesting list.
A curious thought that came from the list here, is there a list on the Madman boards which list all the animation companies from Japan?
Like Studio Gibli, Toei and all the other ones?


You can find a very cluttered version of this over here.
Thanks for the link.
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tobys_sachiel
Doraemon


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
whats up with bonzi what dose that mean
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
tobys_sachiel wrote:
whats up with bonzi what dose that mean


bonji [梵字]? "priest writing". In the west it's more normally referred to as Siddham; it's a writing system used for certain buddhist religious purposes [mostly, writing sutras in the prakit or sanskrit languages]. It's those rounded, fairly tall & thin sorta swirly letters you occasionally see in manga as a background to people doing incantations; quite distinctive.

It's an ancestor of Devanagari [the commonest indian script] and has most of its more insanely complex features. I don't believe it currently has a unicode allocation.

Bonsai "盆栽" are minaturised trees.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'm assuming they're referring to Bonzai, as in what Japanese people seem to enjoy yelling on western tv.
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Nargun
Siegfried Kircheis


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
That's banzai. 万歳, "ten thousand years [old]"-> "may you live a long life" -> "yay".
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