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traveling to japan



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traveling to japan
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coldfire
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Joined: 30 Apr 2004
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2004 10:43 pm    Post subject: traveling to japan Reply with quote
well i was thinking about travelling to japan for a short holiday and was thinking if there was any sort of anime production studios or that sort of thing where u could have tours . if any one knows anything at all it be a big help. i only thinking about goin at the moment.
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Slykura
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2004 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Not really. Unless you go on a specailised tour like the Pop japan packages, but they are USA exclusive I believe.

Best you can do though and this is a must, is visit the Ghibli Museum. Just remember to book your ticket IN Australia BEFORE you go. There are limited amounts of tickets per country per day(it's that popular) and MUST be booked before hand. Contact your travel agent to find out where you need to go to get it as there are specialised travel agents in your capital city designated to arrange for tickets.
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coldfire
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2004 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
do u know how much a ticket would be at all
and i mostly want ot go to buy figurines and stuff
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InGram
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 16, 2004 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
What Sly said. Go there.

I took the addresses of Gainax and Production I.G. in Tokyo but never actually ended up going, since they were on the other side of town.
I took a Madman logo sticker that I was planning on sticking under the Gainax sign and taking a photo. Razz

You could easily spend days and days in the stores of Akihabara, Ikebukuro and Nakano. Wink I sure did...

There was some package plan a while ago (saw a flyer for it in the Cartoon Gallery) that took you to the Ghibli museum, a big anime convention and other stuff like that. Ask at a travel agent.
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mrgazpacho
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 1:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Ingram, that package plan would have been for the JTB-run tour to the Tokyo Anime Fair, which occurs around the last week of March. Check www.japantravel.com.au to see what JTB have on offer nowadays.

In October 2002, I went on the JTB "Kichijoji Character Festival" tour to Tokyo and we went to Gainax. After we got out of the lift, the guy wouldn't even let me take a picture of the door to the studio!!!

I did get a picture of their sign on the footpath out the front of the building though.
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philnicau
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
coldfire wrote:
do u know how much a ticket would be at all
and i mostly want ot go to buy figurines and stuff


The Ghibli Museum is in Mitaka Tokyo, open only 3 days a week, must be booked in Advance via JTB in your home country (cost is approx A$15+A$10 booking fee), but is worth it, it was one of the highlights of my last trip to Tokyo, NB:get there early (before it opens) as we had to wait in line for 45 mins just to get in.(even though we had reserved tickets for that day) also book early as there are only 1000 tickets per day and about 10% are available to those outside Japan, if possible give JTB a few alternate days.
http://www.japantravel.com.au/
http://www.tautoz.com/ghiblimuseum/
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Mangaman
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
InGram wrote:
You could easily spend days and days in the stores of Akihabara, Ikebukuro and Nakano. Wink I sure did...


My brother visited Japan last year on one of his clever science/professor/research/thingie events, as there was a conference in Hokkaido. Luckily, he had a few days in Tokyo and visited Akihabara and was overwhelmed by the extent of ecchi material available there.

... but I'm sure you didn't notice InGram Wink

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mrgazpacho
Koyomi Mizuhara


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mangaman wrote:

Akihabara and was overwhelmed by the extent of ecchi material available there.

... but I'm sure you didn't notice


It's pretty hard *not* to notice when you're walking along the street, and some shops seem to be oozing a pink glow out at you... Razz
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coldfire
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
well having never been to japan can u hire translators or do the sales people speak english.
my friend just came back and said there is heaps of store in Akihabara
and she saw some costume stores.
she didnt have enough room i her bags for stuff i wanted.
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mrgazpacho
Koyomi Mizuhara


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Take a phrase book. Read a little of it before you go. Maybe also take a pad and pen for when sign language and handwaving breaks down Smile

Hardly any shopkeepers speak English, but at least the prices are marked in numbers you can read. Speaking of which - the 5 yen coin is a curiosity in that it alone of all the Japanese coins has no Arabic numerals.
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coldfire
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
well can u hire tranlators are they exspensive i heard somthing about electronic tranlators do u know anything. is the money hard to use or easy. or would travelor checks be or credit
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mrgazpacho
Koyomi Mizuhara


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
If you're talking about a human, yes I'd expect it to be horrendously expensive. You are apying someone's wages for however long they're working.

I think an electronic dictionary would be no better than a paper one, and possibly more fiddly.

Cash is always a good idea in Japan, although in Tokyo most of the shops will take Credit Cards.

The money is easy, because all the notes and all the coins except one have "Western" numerals. I think just about all the prices will be in Western numerals as well.

And now I am off to China for a holiday so good night and good luck Mr. Green
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Slykura
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 17, 2004 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Ask yourself this question coldfire. Can you hire English to Japanese translators locally? How much do you think they'll cost?

Honestly I think you've seriously embrassed yourself tremendously.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I speak maybe 5 words of Japanese and I came back with suitcases full of bought stuff... it's not too hard to pick up you want and put it on the counter. All their prices are written in our numbers, as is their currency, so it's good... I highly recommend you take a few minutes to learn about how to be polite in Japan though. It'll get you further than all the money in the world.
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Nargun
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Remember: The shopkeepers want to sell you stuff!!

They want to suck money from you like a vampire sucks blood; that's how it works. They don't care that they don't really understand what you're saying Point at stuff, and wave crinkly bits of paper. They will give you stuff, and take the paper off you; they might even give you bits of paper back.

It's that simple. People have been trading across language barriers since before the dawn of time.

Here's ALL THE JAPANESE YOU NEED TO BUY STUFF:
"kore, ikura?" [how much?]
"takai..." [too much...]
"yosh, kau." [Right; I'll buy it].

That and some spoken japanese numbers should see you set, I 'd say.
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philnicau
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Nargun wrote:
Remember: The shopkeepers want to sell you stuff!!

They want to suck money from you like a vampire sucks blood; that's how it works. They don't care that they don't really understand what you're saying Point at stuff, and wave crinkly bits of paper. They will give you stuff, and take the paper off you; they might even give you bits of paper back.

It's that simple. People have been trading across language barriers since before the dawn of time.

Here's ALL THE JAPANESE YOU NEED TO BUY STUFF:
"kore, ikura?" [how much?]
"takai..." [too much...]
"yosh, kau." [Right; I'll buy it].

That and some spoken japanese numbers should see you set, I 'd say.


You don't even need that much Japanese, just get used to pointing and nodding a lot.
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MR_MR2
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I went on holidays to Japan this year and I agree with all those that said to visit the Ghibli museum it was definitely one of the highlights of my holidays. As for speaking Japanese, unless you venture out of the major cities you dont really need to know much Japanese to get around.
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I highly recommend you take a few minutes to learn about how to be polite in Japan though. It'll get you further than all the money in the world.
Mr Waffle is right if you be polite to the Japanese they will go out of their way to help you out.
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TheFish
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I shall now opine with much useless knowledge.

You don't need to say a word in japanese in the country if you stay in the big cities. When shopping I did not even speak. Put the Item on the counter. They rung it up on a till with the total where it could be read by the customer, or typed it onto a calculator. You give money, they give change. all the train stations I saw had signs in romaji.

The Ghibli tour is a must for any anime fan. They do a short film presentation. Mine was of some Pixar stuff, the two studios are working closly together at the moment. Our projectionist was the man himslef Miyazaki. I loved the place.

Akihabara is over-rated. The main street is the same as any shopping district in the country, and the back alleys on the eastern side were full of people selling **** out of large tubs. It had a trash and treasure feel to it.

The thing that did supprise me was the sheer amount of porn around though. The Gamers stores, of Digi charat fame, had a seperate division called mellon for the hentai stuff. normally located very close to gamers. But the animate shops it was just mixed in with everything else. I swear the chick behind the counter in the mellon shop in Kyoto could not have been older than 16.

There are anime/manga shops everywhere. The best I found was a mandrake shop where there were about 10 small shops spread over a large complex like a westfield. I think it was shinjuku. It may have been the next stop on the line to mitaka though. Stop there on the way back from ghibli if you can. They had the largest range of new manga I saw. As well as extensive second hand places.

The biggest disappointment was in the murchandising. Unless it was the current show being pushed by the studios it was hard to find any murchandise at all.

If you do go to Ghibli, take a seperate credit card because the gift shop there is one of the wonders of the world.
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coldfire
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
well i think will stay around the akihabara area.
u said they new manga that would be in japanese now wouldnt it, or would the occassional store have english ones as well.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
There won't be any english manga, unless you happen to find bilingual... english manga is only made in Singapore and the USA.

No real need for a credit card since most stores don't accept it, make sure you track down the nearest Citibank or Post office, as they have ATM's that any Cirrus card can use (check you bank card, it should be on there). Make sure your pin is 6 or less characters cause that's the max for the PO though.

The only Japanese I really used was (I have no idea how to spell it, sorry) "sur-reem-ass-en", it means excuse me. You'll hear it ALOT. That's all you need to get attention. After that, hand jestures will do. Oh, and Japanese pronunciation of words... ie they had no idea what I meant by "eurobeat", once I said "you-ro-beat-o" they understood instantly ^^; if you're after a Japanese anime/band/whatever, crudely write out/print the name and point at it, they'll understand. Their written english is FAR better than spoken, so quite a few shopkeepers can read english names (Gamers is in english, for example).

Oh, and softdrink is "soda". I recommend the "graypo soda" (grape fanta) personally Razz

Finally, I suggest you hit Harajuku on Sunday if you like cosplay. You'll understand why when you get there Razz
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coldfire
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
so in stores that sell anime and all that stuff if ask for say a rei figurine they will understand or will i have to say evangelion.
sombody said before they its gets u further if your polite wat is considered as being polite in japanese saying thanks , or hand gestures.
do they exept travelers checks.
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philnicau
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
coldfire wrote:
so in stores that sell anime and all that stuff if ask for say a rei figurine they will understand or will i have to say evangelion.
sombody said before they its gets u further if your polite wat is considered as being polite in japanese saying thanks , or hand gestures.
do they exept travelers checks.


Write things down in english "Use Capital Letters -ABCDE", remember if possible to use the Japanese names of anime and manga (sakura taisen instead of sakura wars), carry cash (Japan is probably the safest country in the world) as most stores will not accept Credit Cards (often only Japanese ones) or Travellers Checks (but Major Post Offices will change Travellers Cheques, as will big hotels).
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coldfire
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
so u say its safe, so its ok to walk around the shops at night.
only having travel to the states where its probaly worse there, i felt safe even though im pretty big.
how do i be polite in japanese?
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 7:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Say excuse me (in Japanese) for attention... then thankyou (in Japanese) for their attention... smile... don't push or shove... general being polite.

If you don't know thankyou in Japanese you've obivously not watched subbed anime Razz

Traveller's cheques are a waste of time imo. ATM all the way.

Tokyo is so safe, when you get back to Australia you'll be insanely paranoid, I know I was, Tokyo is so much safer than Australia it isn't funny. People leave their doors unlocked, they leave their bikes unchained for hours, even days, and know they'll be there when they get back...

Make sure you know the Japanese names for anime. They don't know the english. As said before it's a pain to find old anime stuff... bargin bins and small shops are good for that, I found the Rei and Asuka wedding figures for ~$20 each, too bad they wouldn't fit in my suitcase... finding room for stuff coming home is easily the biggest problem going there Wink
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coldfire
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
so most stores will not have eva stuff. wil they have hellsing , berserk, steel angel kurumi.
i will be carry lots of money like i always do and i feel safe if its true wat u say.
and i thin a will take two suit cases and a big carry on, i dont mind paying extra for excess bagage.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
coldfire wrote:
so most stores will not have eva stuff. wil they have hellsing , berserk, steel angel kurumi.
i will be carry lots of money like i always do and i feel safe if its true wat u say.
and i thin a will take two suit cases and a big carry on, i dont mind paying extra for excess bagage.


Not much... you're talking about shows that are several years old. You'll have a much better chance of finding stuff for new shows. The only Initial D stuff I found anywhere was a remote control evo, for example...

Oh and extra suitcases... uh... might wanna look at the cost of going over weight. On Qantas it's max 20kg.... JAL let me go with 20.5... I dunno the going rate for excess weight, but they wanted to charge my brother $700 to carry his golfclubs (he didn't have to cause they let him bring them over for free though) home to London...
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Shinannth
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 11:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mr Waffle wrote:
The only Japanese I really used was (I have no idea how to spell it, sorry) "sur-reem-ass-en", it means excuse me. You'll hear it ALOT.


Sumimasen, although some Japanese also use Suimasen.

Mr Waffle wrote:
That's all you need to get attention. After that, hand jestures will do. Oh, and Japanese pronunciation of words... ie they had no idea what I meant by "eurobeat", once I said "you-ro-beat-o" they understood instantly ^^;


Hehe, I went to a seminar about two months ago given by Masumi Muramatsu, one of Japan's most famous simultaneous JP-ENG interpreters, and he said that when saying foreign words in Japanese, it's good to over-emphasise the pronounciation like you did above, because if nothing else, "it's cute". Laughing
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Jeranon
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
You mean it's "KI YU TO". Or something. I suck at Japanese. Razz
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philnicau
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mr Waffle wrote:
coldfire wrote:
so most stores will not have eva stuff. wil they have hellsing , berserk, steel angel kurumi.
i will be carry lots of money like i always do and i feel safe if its true wat u say.
and i thin a will take two suit cases and a big carry on, i dont mind paying extra for excess bagage.


Not much... you're talking about shows that are several years old. You'll have a much better chance of finding stuff for new shows. The only Initial D stuff I found anywhere was a remote control evo, for example...

Oh and extra suitcases... uh... might wanna look at the cost of going over weight. On Qantas it's max 20kg.... JAL let me go with 20.5... I dunno the going rate for excess weight, but they wanted to charge my brother $700 to carry his golfclubs (he didn't have to cause they let him bring them over for free though) home to London...


Standard for excess baggage is 1% of the undiscounted economy fare per kilo, approx A$35-40 per kilo, if your buying a lot you might want to consider mailing things home, Seamail is about A$10 per kilo and takes 4-6 weeks.
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 4:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
philnicau wrote:
Standard for excess baggage is 1% of the undiscounted economy fare per kilo, approx A$35-40 per kilo


Ouch.

I'm so very glad I gave my last little koala clip to the nice lady at Kansai airport for not busting my baggage weight XD (my carry on luggage was heaps heavy as well, I was smuggling dozens of gashapons, cds, and a parapara ps2 controller in there XD)
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fiathriel
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Guys, can some of you that went give some sort of average of how much it cost you? I know what airfares are worth and all, but what about accommodation and food, also with a bit of spending money . . . . . how many thousand will cut it if you are holidaying for a few weeks?

Thanks
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TheGreatNinjaFanBoy
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Hey Mr. Waffle. How much did you spend in total? I'm mostly interested in how much to get there and all expeses concerning one's stay.

My friends and I are seriously considering going as soon as we have a reasonably amount of money. We're going to take cameras and record us screwin' 'round in Tokyo.

EDIT: Damn! You beat me...
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fiathriel
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Holy crap, only by 2 minutes!!!! Great minds Razz
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Hmm. Well we booked through JTB. They did us a package of ~$1800 for return tickets, week rail pass (on JR lines {which includes bullet train}), couple of nights accommodation. You can get cheaper if you go with cheaper airline (though you do stopovers that way) as we were with JAL/Qantas. I don't recommend a rail pass unless you plan on catching the bullet train (cause a ticket can be $100+).

Cost to stay /night... hmm... you can get as little as $20 a night if you stay at a backpackers, check out www.yha.com.au , if you're a member with them you can stay at a bunch of different places cheap. Honestly, you could survive on $5/day food+travel, the convenience stores ("conbini") sell 70 yen noodles if you're willing to spend thrifty... train tickets can be $1-$5 depending on how far you travel.

For the record I spent several thousand... I recommend you take at LEAST $1,000 spending money, cause you'll see so much stuff that you want (and is much cheaper than here). A better figure for cash is $2,000+, way more if you want to buy a camera etc (I did, $800 got me the top Sony digital with a bunch of extras including a mem card).

Honestly the biggest limiting factor is your luggage... we went in summer so our bags were empty, cause summer there is like Asia & Darwin, aka tshirt and shorts weather Razz
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InGram
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Shinannth wrote:
...because if nothing else, "it's cute". Laughing


I kept saying "desu" like a girl, mostly because I found it amusing.

The most common thing I said by far was sumimasen.

One very useful one was "Kurejito kaado wa iie desu ka?" (Are credit cards OK?)
At one anime store, the guy then asked me something which I didn't understand, so he pulled out a little printed sign from behind a nearby register that said something like "Is a bulk charge OK?"
Because you have to pay for whatever you buy on each floor of a store, even if the floors are the size of a car parking space, I assume at the end of the day, they add your purchases together and charge you that as one big chunk. Anyone else know better?
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TheGreatNinjaFanBoy
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Thanks Mr Waffle. That puts things in perspective. So I got some saving to do. The whole conversion thing between Aus Dollars and Japanese Yen seems pretty confusing. Maths isn't my forte.

I can't wait to go even though it may be a year or so in the future. Is Tokyo intimidating at all? Being big and very occupied and all.
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Cypher-Khan
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Hmm,

Well, I just booked my ticket for my upcoming trip (which was hard considering how late it is.)

Anyway, I was fairly lucky to get a scholarship thing - so from the 26th of nov till the 11th of december I have free bed and board...

But the ticket I booked gets me there a day before that, and I leave 4 days after...

Which is going to be fun...

So, in that regard. I have questions.

a- Hostels... can they be found relatively easily?? and if so, which district (of Tokyo) would be the best to stay in.

b- would 2 full days (ie, arrive the day before and leave on the 2nd full day) be worth the effort of heading to Kyoto and back?? I know little about thier rail system.

c- when in Tokyo.. amusing and interesting places to visit (not including Shinjuku or anywhere near Kamakura)

d- are those kareoke places Ive heard about really open 24/7... cause I could skip accomodation for a night if thats the case...

e- 1500 dollars will be sufficient for a 20 day trip correct?? (this is keeping in mind that most of my accomodation and food is already paid for by Shohoku college) - I have no desire for electronics... - just manga and strange anime stuff.

f- *skips f*

g- What are the names of the huge anime/manga stores... - that would be helpful to know...

------------

My language proficency is enough to get me by... and I have two friends on a similar level of competancy. And considering that many speak english anyway communication wont be a problem.


------------

On a compleatly different note Singapore airlines are good right?? as is thier Airport (the name of which presantly escapes me)??

I have conformation on both,... but thats from a friend in singapore who has never flown and only been to the airport a few times.

--------------------

Oh, and Ingram... No matter how amusing stressing the "su" is... I cant being myself to say it. It just sounds so wrong... same with "suki"... - its not "suuki" (this is more directed at my friends than anyone else)

Me and cute pronounciation do not mix... Kurumi drove me insane with all her "de~su"... both the way she said it and the frequency she said it were unnatural.

-----------------

Ninjafanboy... - whats hard about the conversions?? - just divide the yen price by the current exchange rate - which is:

1AUD = Japanese Yen 79.3777

if dividing by 79.3777 isnt an easy task... then divide by 80 - that'll tell you how many Australian dollars you are paying. In order to determine how much your dollars will be worth... simply times by 79.3777...

as I mentioned earlier I intend to go with about 1500 dollars - thats 119066.55 yen.



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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
TheGreatNinjaFanBoy wrote:
Thanks Mr Waffle. That puts things in perspective. So I got some saving to do. The whole conversion thing between Aus Dollars and Japanese Yen seems pretty confusing. Maths isn't my forte.

I can't wait to go even though it may be a year or so in the future. Is Tokyo intimidating at all? Being big and very occupied and all.


Currency- I took my mobile with me, it has a currency converter built in. I used it often Wink

Tokyo- If you've been to Sydney CBD, it's like that, only that it covers the entire freaking city. It's fantastic. If you like cities, that is... I imagine people who don't like cities won't be able to handle it, everything is very small and close together. Not much room to yourself at all... especially the trains (yes, everything you've seen about how packed they get is completely true).

Sigh... my beloved Tokyo... I'll be back, I promise~~~~

Cypher-Khan wrote:
stuff


Check the YHA site, you need to be a member to use the hostels there. Stay somewhere near a JR line so you can get on the loop line.

Places to visit... Harajuku for rock/goths/homies galore, Roppungi for clubs, Ginza for touristy stuff...

$1,500 will be fine if you're buying little things. Just make sure you track how much you spend or you'll use it all up in a day Razz

Kyoto is 2 hours by shinkasen (bullet train). I dunno the time by regular train. Ticket to get there would be hella expensive... it's worth it if you have a JR rail pass (free ticket), I enjoyed Kyoto for a daytrip when I was in Osaka, it's a very stark difference from Tokyo. Think going from Sydney to Canberra Razz lots of oldskool temples and stuff.
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Cypher-Khan
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Joined: 16 Nov 2002
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Kyoto is 2 hours by shinkasen (bullet train). I dunno the time by regular train. Ticket to get there would be hella expensive... it's worth it if you have a JR rail pass (free ticket), I enjoyed Kyoto for a daytrip when I was in Osaka, it's a very stark difference from Tokyo. Think going from Sydney to Canberra Razz lots of oldskool temples and stuff.


Man, Im mainly going cause I love hearing Kansai people talk... thier dialect is so much more fun than the Standard...

I desaperatley want to learn Osakaben... but I'll pick that up after learning standard japanese.

Hmm, no free ticket... and I read earlier about the expense thing... - So I may cheap out and go by normal train... Im sure it will be just as exciting... if not a little slower.

Thanks for the info tho.
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TheGreatNinjaFanBoy
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Joined: 28 Jun 2003
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Tokyo- If you've been to Sydney CBD, it's like that, only that it covers the entire freaking city. It's fantastic. If you like cities, that is... I imagine people who don't like cities won't be able to handle it, everything is very small and close together. Not much room to yourself at all... especially the trains (yes, everything you've seen about how packed they get is completely true).


Oh I love Sydney. I Get sick of walking though. I guess comfortable shoes are in order. I like the idea that Japan is very confortable in that it feels safe. In sydney I really didn't feel safe, even during the day.

Actually, what's the coolest clothing label in Japan. As in casual street wear, for example Billabong is stupidly popular. I prefer Hook-ups, Von vipper and Mambo. So anything that has cool prints and stuff... I'd really want to buy some Japanese clothing labels.
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InGram
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mr Waffle wrote:
Sigh... my beloved Tokyo... I'll be back, I promise~~~~


Next time I go, I'm going to try to find that Tim Rogers guy, and king-hit him. Very Happy
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
InGram wrote:
Mr Waffle wrote:
Sigh... my beloved Tokyo... I'll be back, I promise~~~~


Next time I go, I'm going to try to find that Tim Rogers guy, and king-hit him. Very Happy


Was that the Andrew G-wannabe aussie on the Avex music show? Or the guy teaching english to the little kids in the morning? I hate them both. I want those jobs. THE GUY INTERVIEWED MOVE T_T

Can't be bothered quoting. Here we go-

1) I walked 15-20km a day in Japan (I had a pedometer on me from work at the time, 20,000+ steps/day), so being in some sort of decent physical shape will help, as well as comfy shoes Razz

2) Japanese brands arn't obvious like ours (from what I could see). The homies love adidas, nike etc however. Sizes there are smaller than ours- I can fit into a medium tshirt here, but a large over there is too small in the arms. The coolest clothes they have are in Harajuku in the goth shops (if you're into punk/goth), or the engrish sk8er clothes. VERY amusing Razz (again, nothing fit me though) oh, and clothes, shoes etc are approx. the same price as here.

3) Train from Tokyo to Kyoto... well... it takes 2 hours on the shinkasen (on Hikari, I imagine Nozomi is much faster, but not free for rail pass...), which travels at 300kph, so I shudder to think how long the regular one will take... a comparison is it's 15mins Kyoto-Osaka by shinkasen, 45 mins by regular train.

4) There is no 4.

5) Just thought of something. DON'T just stick to your planned little area. Explore. There is so much that regular tourists won't see because they're too afraid to go for a walk around. We wouldn't have found the best parts of the trip if we stuck to our plan, we had so much fun discovering new shops and places and meeting new people. HAVE AN ADVENTURE. I'm afraid Japan is going to be more and more gaijin-ised in time, so I recommend getting a taste of the unique lifes they have there as much as you can, while you can.
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TheFish
Hajime Saitou


Joined: 13 Jun 2002
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mr Waffle is giving good advice.

I remember the trip from Kyoto to Tokyo being closer to 3 ours by shinkansen, but whatever, It aint really a day trip anyway. Kyoto takes at least a week to even get a taste of it.

If you are looking to stay in Tokyo I can not recomend the Sawanoya in Ueno enough. It is in the lonley planet guide. The place is walking distance from Ueno station, where one of the provate lines from Narita stops. Very convinient and cheap.

I suggest getting the Lonley planet guide for Japan, It is full of good advice, and lots of useful maps. If any of you soon to be travelers are in adelaide I can lend you my copy. It is the latest edition still.
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StorminNorman
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
InGram wrote:
Next time I go, I'm going to try to find that Tim Rogers guy, and king-hit him. Very Happy


I have his address, somewhere...
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Mr Waffle
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Oh yeah, Lonely Planet guide is good. Some of the info is a bit off (well in our opinons after the trip), but most is solid gold. The phrase section in the back was really helpful as well ^^;

The 3 hour shinkasen trip was probably on Max, the slowest of the three on that line, btw. I think it was ~1hr for Nozomi, ~2hrs Hikari, ~3 for Max (basically more stops but cheaper). One thing I HATED about the shinkasen was the lack of luggage storage areas. We had to sit with out suitcases in the footwells... we were fine, but it was annoying. The trains out to the airports (Narita Express in Tokyo and the Kansai Express in Osaka) both had luggage areas... sigh.
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Raven Xavier
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Joined: 08 Jun 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
when you go to japan
Shinjyuku his a must see
it is the electronic's district
there is one in tokyo and Kyoto
one shop took me a whole day to get through
and most of all have fun
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Raven Xavier wrote:
when you go to japan
Shinjyuku his a must see
it is the electronic's district
there is one in tokyo and Kyoto
one shop took me a whole day to get through
and most of all have fun


The electronics district of Tokyo is Akihabara... they even call it that (there is a sign at the train station saying "Electric Town" pointing towards it). Right outside is a 7 story Gamers store... drool

Did you typo Shinjuku? That's actually the rich hotel district (my naming anyway). It's where all the offensively expensive hotels like the Mirage are, as well as a big fancy shopping mall (though I didn't go in... forgot to XD) and a cool market place (well, lots of little streets with shops) which reminded me of Malaysia. I'm told there are plenty of Love Hotels and photography shops, though I didn't visit those. Razz
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StorminNorman
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Isn't Shinjuku the main nightclub district or something?

I vaguely recall that there's an electric town or something like it in Osaka, too.

Not... that I'd know, of course, having never been.
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MR_MR2
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Joined: 18 Feb 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
The electronic district in Osaka is called Den-Den town, i dont remember exactly what suburb it was in.
As for main nightclub district that depends what your after Shinjuku does have some pretty cool clubs (Gas Panic wooooo!) but the main area for foreignors is Roppongi, plus Roppongi has the classiet and tastiest sushi train I've ever been to.
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philnicau
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Joined: 19 Dec 2000
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mr Waffle wrote:
Oh yeah, Lonely Planet guide is good. Some of the info is a bit off (well in our opinons after the trip), but most is solid gold. The phrase section in the back was really helpful as well ^^;

The 3 hour shinkasen trip was probably on Max, the slowest of the three on that line, btw. I think it was ~1hr for Nozomi, ~2hrs Hikari, ~3 for Max (basically more stops but cheaper). One thing I HATED about the shinkasen was the lack of luggage storage areas. We had to sit with out suitcases in the footwells... we were fine, but it was annoying. The trains out to the airports (Narita Express in Tokyo and the Kansai Express in Osaka) both had luggage areas... sigh.


Actually the trains go Nozomi (fastest- but NOT available on JR PASS), Hikari (Fast) , Kodama (slowest-stops most stations), these are between Tokyo -Nagoya-Kyoto-Osaka-Hiroshima-Hakata, other routes have different names the Maxx runs between Tokyo and Hachinoe.
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